first_imgRepresentatives of governments, the private sector, civil society groups and philanthropic organizations have pledged billions of dollars to protect vast swaths of the world’s oceans.The impacts of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing and climate change on the world’s oceans were a focus of recently concluded Our Ocean Conference in Bali, Indonesia.Cooperation between governments is needed to prevent the world’s oceans from experiencing devastating damage from an onslaught of factors led by climate change. NUSA DUA, Indonesia — Global participants in the fifth Our Ocean Conference have pledged the highest amount of funding yet for new initiatives and commitments on the protection of a combined expanse of ocean eight times the size of Alaska.The event, hosted by the Indonesian government on the island of Bali, generated 287 pledges in bilateral and multilateral agreements between governments, the private sector, civil society organizations and philanthropic foundations. The pledges were valued at more than $10 billion to protect some 14 million square kilometers (5.4 million square miles) of the world’s oceans, according to Luhut Pandjaitan, Indonesia’s coordinating minister for maritime affairs.To date, the Our Ocean Conference has raked in commitments totaling $28 billion and covering 26.4 million square kilometers (10.2 million square miles) of ocean.“These numbers are beyond our expectations,” Luhut said in his closing remarks on Oct. 30. “We are thankful for your collective contributions and making our ocean healthier and (more) sustainable.”Heads of government and representatives from the private sector, civil society organizations and philanthropic foundations took part in the fifth edition of the Our Ocean Conference in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia. Image courtesy of the Our Ocean Conference.The impacts of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing and climate change on the world’s oceans were the key focuses during the two-day conference. Data from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) showed that the value of fish captured illegally was about 26 million tons, or up to $23 billion annually. The world’s maritime resources are valued at around $24 trillion.“Illegal fishing globally still decimates fisheries at an unsustainable pace,” said former U.S. secretary of state John Kerry in his speech on Oct. 29.“Illegal fishing continues on an unmitigated, unsustainable pace and almost one-third of the world’s fisheries are still overexploited,” he said. He added that the remainder of fisheries “are either at peak or nearly at peak with more and more people in the middle class, more and more people with money, more and more people demanding fresh fish on their table in their restaurants in their country.”Kerry said a billion people worldwide depended on fish as their primary source of protein. If the world fails to do more to protect the oceans, there would be “an unrecognizable fishing industry which will pit country against country and promote even more money-driven decision-making than we face today,” he said.“Protecting the ocean doesn’t hurt jobs, it is jobs,” he added.Indonesian President Joko Widodo called for a “mental revolution,” a concept recycled from his 2014 election campaign, to address the challenges facing the world’s seas and to manage them in a sustainable manner.“The ocean’s health is very concerning,” he said in his speech on Oct. 29. “We are aware of plastic waste, water pollution, destruction of coral reefs, warming of sea temperature, the rise of sea levels, and so forth.”He also warned of increases in maritime piracy, human trafficking, drug smuggling and slavery.“The OOC must be the driving engine behind a global mental revolution to nurture our oceans,” Widodo said.Indonesian President Joko Widodo has called for a global “mental revolution” to protect and conserve the world’s oceans. Image courtesy of Our Ocean Conference.Both Kerry and Widodo also called on other world leaders to step up the fight against climate change to protect the oceans. Kerry said cooperation between governments to address climate change impacts would require the same kind of efforts it took to prevent nuclear clashes during the Cold War.“In the 1950s and ’60s, what brought me into public life was the nuclear freeze and arms control, the issues of peace,” Kerry said. “But now, folks, we need to face up to the fact that we’ve got to treat the issue of the oceans, and the protection of the oceans, and the protection of the planet, with the same urgency that we treated arms control and nuclear weapons.“We need a non-proliferation treaty for pollution in the oceans, we need a global agreement where everybody is agreeing on how we’re going to enforce in the high seas, how we contribute. We had to do it in the United Nations, and we do through separate entities, but we need to do that,” Kerry added.Former U.S. secretary of state John Kerry says the fight against climate change requires the same kind of commitment that it took to prevent nuclear clashes during the Cold War. Image courtesy of Our Ocean Conference.He said rising temperatures had changed the basic chemistry of the oceans faster than in the last 50 million years, threatening marine life. Kerry said the damage had reached such extreme levels that there could soon be more plastic than fish in the oceans, short of governments addressing the pressing issues.“You can’t protect the ocean without solving climate change. And you can’t solve climate change without protecting the ocean,” Kerry said.Citing last month’s report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which warned of a mass die-off of coral reefs as soon as 2040, Kerry said he remained optimistic that countries would act to solve the problems.“Twelve years is the target for the governments to become responsible. For leaders to lead,” he said.He urged better collaboration to achieve goals in marine conservation and protection.“It’s a shared responsibility that affects the $500 billion global economy and the livelihoods of 12 percent of the world’s population,” he said. “It’s about the next generation being able to count on the oceans the same way our generation took it for granted until sometimes pushing it to the brink of breaking.”However, Kerry said there were still more than 400 unresolved maritime boundary disputes that had unfortunately compounded the problem of ungoverned spaces.“This is not the time to rest on laurels, not when all over the globe there’s too much money still chasing too few fish, not when [on] the high seas there’s still too little enforcement,” he said.To improve global cooperation, Widodo also called for the enforcement of international law to resolve territorial disputes between countries.“Overlapping maritime claims that if not resolved through negotiations and based on international law may pose a threat to stability,” he said. “International law must be the guidance in the settlement of maritime claims.”More than 90 percent of world trade by volume, and 40 percent by value, goes through the ocean. Similarly, 61 percent of the world’s crude oil production is distributed through the ocean.“No single country can resolve the challenges that we face alone,” Widodo said. “No single country can optimize the benefits of the oceans for the benefit of the entire world alone. Not even the government can solve everything.”Banner image of Layang Layang Atoll, Spratly Islands, South China Sea. Image by Greg Asner/Divephoto.org. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Climate Activism, Climate Change And Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Activism, Global Warming, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Marine, Marine Conservation, Marine Crisis, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Ocean Warming, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *