Finish strong: The Marshfield boys hockey team prepares for a late-season run

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — The Marshfield boys hockey team will not have a winning record in the Wisconsin Valley Conference this season and will have to fight and claw even to get to the .500 mark overall. However, that does not mean the Tigers are a team in turmoil.After starting the season 2-7-1, Marshfield had won three of its last five games prior to Tuesday’s matchup with Wisconsin Rapids, including earning its first shutout of the year with a 1-0 victory over Regis/Altoona/McDonell Jan. 21.Marshfield suffered through a 6-17-1 season a year ago, going 2-9 in the Wisconsin Valley Conference. With four conference and six overall games remaining, the Tigers will look to build off their recent momentum as they head toward the WIAA playoffs beginning Feb. 14.“We are pleased that our team is continuing to support each other even after some tough losses,” Marshfield coach Eric Bowman said. “Hockey is truly a team sport, and all players on the ice and on the bench must contribute in some way in order to field a successful team. The boys are banding together and spending time together away from the rink, which is important.“The staff and students at the school are also very supportive of our team, which goes a long way in developing our confidence. We are starting to see a shift in that culture of our team. When we lose, guys are not happy and are working hard the next day. When we win, players want to win by more. They are starting to show a competitive level that we must continue to develop if we want to turn our program into a successful program.”With only four seniors and one junior on the roster, the Tigers are fighting uphill in most games just based on experience.The play of leading scorer Zach Schmidt, Colin Barth, and goalkeeper Haydon Roy-Peterson, three of the team’s seniors, as well as junior Tyler Spaeth and a strong group of sophomores has Bowman excited for the rest of the season.“As a coaching staff, we have some lofty goals that we would like to achieve in the final weeks of the season heading into playoffs,” Bowman said. “Our primary concern is winning the two games against teams from Section 2 so we can have a better position in the postseason (Regis, which the Tigers did on Saturday, and Chequamegon on Jan. 31). We also would like to get some wins in conference so that we can finish higher than we have in the past.“We set a goal to get 10 wins at the beginning of the season, and we have a chance to make that happen, but we will have to play very well late in the season and beat a few teams we are not expected to in order to make that goal. This team is confident in their ability to make that happen.”Paul Lecker is publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com, a contributor to Hub City Times Sports. You can reach him by email at paul@marshfieldareasports.com.last_img read more

Kruger Park: jewel in SA’s wildlife crown

first_imgThe world-renowned Kruger National Park, South Africa’s largest game reserve, offers incomparable game and bird viewing, and accommodation to suit every taste, within a biodiversity hotspot the size of a small country.The Big Five (and Little Five) Known for spectacular sightings of the famous Big Five (African elephant, lion, Cape buffalo, leopard and black or white rhino), the Kruger Park offers incomparable game viewing, with about 145 animal species, 110 reptile species, and more than 500 bird species occurring in the area. In addition to the Big Five, all major African big game species are found here, including hippopotamus, giraffe, zebra, warthog, numerous antelope species – including rare antelope such as Tsessebe, Sable and Roan – and large carnivores including cheetah and spotted hyena. It is one of the few remaining viable habitats for the African wild dog, the continent’s most endangered predator. For those who enjoy a challenge, the area is also home to the Little Five (buffalo weaver, elephant shrew, leopard tortoise, ant lion and rhino beetle) and the birding Big Six (ground hornbill, kori bustard, lappet-faced vulture, martial eagle, Pel’s fishing owl and saddle-bill stork).Biodiversity hotspot Kruger National Park is divided into six ecosystems: baobab sandveld, mopane scrub, lebombo knobthorn-marula bushveld, mixed acacia thicket, combretum-silver clusterleaf woodland on granite, and riverine forest. Altogether it has 1 982 species of plants, including the baobab, kiaat tree, fever tree, knobthorn, marula and mopane trees. First established in 1898, the Kruger Park is now also part of the 35 000km² Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, a park with no internal borders that joins the Kruger to Zimbabwe’s Gonarezhou National Park and the Limpopo National Park in Mozambique. The Kruger is also part of the Kruger to Canyons biosphere, an area designated by the United Nations Education and Scientific Organisation under its Man and Biosphere programme. Biosphere reserves are recognised internationally as important areas for conserving biological diversity and developing the necessary scientific and technical knowledge, as well as human values, for successful conservation efforts. The Kruger to Canyons biosphere, encompassing a remarkable 55% of South Africa’s total terrestrial biodiversity, is located in eastern South Africa and bridges the Limpopo and Mpumalanga provinces. It contains a diversity of landscapes, ranging in altitude from more than two kilometres above sea level along the Drakensberg escarpment to 300 metres above sea level nearer the coast.Tourism asset Besides being a highly respected contributor to conservation efforts over the years, Kruger National Park is one of South Africa’s most valuable tourism assets. In 2003 the number of tourists to the park exceeded a million for the first time, a feat that has been achieved every year since then. The Kruger Park offers accommodation to suit the needs and preferences of just about anyone, ranging from five-star luxury to self-catering bungalows, tented camps, and caravans. “There is no doubt in my mind that the park holds a special place in everyone’s hearts,” Tourism Minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk said at a ceremony in June 2008 to mark 110 years of the park’s existence, “and over the last 110 years it has become an icon for the country on many levels, including conservation, tourism and national pride”.As big as a country Covering almost 19 000km², the Kruger National Park is comparable in size to the whole of Wales or Israel. It came into being in 1898 but was then known as the Sabie Game Reserve. Development came a standstill during the South African War, but afterwards the victorious British took up the reins again, tasking Major James Stevenson-Hamilton in 1902 with the responsibility of looking after the area. Stevenson-Hamilton, the first warden of the park, retired in 1946 after holding the post for 44 years. He is commemorated in the name of the park’s main rest camp, Skukuza, which is a Xitsonga word meaning “he who sweeps clean” and refers to his tireless efforts to control poaching. The warden worked hard to gain official status for the park, and in 1926 his efforts were rewarded when the government passed the National Parks Act and proclaimed the Kruger National Park, naming it after the president at the time, Paul Kruger. Stevenson-Hamilton was joined in 1902 by new assistant warden Harry Wolhuter, who famously survived an attack from two lions in 1904, armed with nothing more than a pocketknife. He killed the first lion with the weapon, and his dog kept the second lion at bay until help arrived. The knife and the lion skin can be seen in the Stevenson-Hamilton Memorial Museum at Skukuza. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Satellite images can map poverty

first_imgYou can fix the world’s problems only if you know where they are. That’s why tracking poverty in Africa, for example, is critical for the United Nations, which launched a global poverty campaign last year. But gathering the data on the ground can be dangerous, slow, and expensive. Now, a study using satellite images and machine learning reveals an alternative: mapping poverty from space.High-powered cameras on satellites are constantly snapping photos of Earth, and scientists have wondered whether poverty can be detected just by analyzing the images. The first attempts to do that relied on images of the planet at night. The glow of electric lights paints a glittering map of a region’s infrastructure, showing roughly where the rich and poor live. But at night, moderate economic underdevelopment doesn’t look much different from absolute poverty, defined by the World Bank as life on less than $1.90 per day.So a team of social and computer scientists led by Marshall Burke, an economist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, has been sifting through daytime images. They, too, show only subtle differences between regions of absolute and moderate poverty. Both might have muddy, unpaved roads winding through clusters of tiny dwellings. But daytime images include other key indicators: How far away is the nearest source of water or the closest urban marketplace? Where are the agricultural fields?Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Drawing conclusions from these subtle hints is beyond even a trained human expert—but perhaps not a computer. Making sense of big data sets with multiple variables is a classic challenge for the field of machine learning. The strategy is this: First, get a data set for which the target variable—in this case, per capita income—is already known. Then, train the computer on a subset of those data to create a statistical model that accurately predicts the hidden variable in the rest of the data.Burke’s team used a machine learning technique called a convolutional neural network, which has revolutionized the field of machine vision. They focused on five African countries: Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, and Rwanda. These countries have both large proportions of their populations living in absolute poverty and good survey data to ground truth any predictions made by the computer.As the team reports online today in Science, daytime satellite images are dramatically better than nighttime images for mapping African poverty. Compared with the nighttime images, the daytime images were 81% more accurate at predicting poverty in places under the absolute poverty line and 99% more accurate in areas where incomes are less than half that.Ground-based surveys will still be needed to build and validate this tool, says Marc Levy, a political scientist at The Earth Institute at Columbia University in Palisades, New York, who was not involved in the research. But the study shows that satellites plus surveys are “vastly more powerful than either one alone,” he says, especially in regions where ground-based surveys are difficult or impossible. Extending this technique to the rest of the world will take more work, he notes. “These five countries are much more similar to each other than they are as a group to other world regions.” For example, he says, Africa is the last “holdout” in the historic trend toward urbanization, with most of its people still living in rural areas. “Using the techniques of this paper in countries that are majority urban is likely to be harder—though still likely to work.”last_img read more

Food cravings peak twice nightly, in countries all around the world

first_img Food cravings peak twice nightly, in countries all around the world Do you ever find yourself scouring the web for pizza delivery services to satisfy those late-night cravings? You’re not alone: A new study reveals hungry web surfers around the world all start searching for food-related information at two peak times, 7 p.m. and 2 a.m.Wanting to see whether they could spot trends in human behavior based on a massive database of Google searches, a team of scientists analyzed hourly food-related queries from five countries: the United States, Canada, India, Australia, and the United Kingdom. For two 1-week periods, they looked for general food-related keywords such as “pizza delivery” or “Chinese delivery” and country-specific delivery companies like India’s “Swiggy” and “Just Eat,” which serves the United Kingdom and Australia. They also analyzed 5 years of data to see whether they could discover seasonal trends.The two spikes in food-related searches occurred across all countries, keywords, days of the week, and seasons, the researchers report today in Royal Society Open Science. They say the peaks likely represent two different groups of people searching for nighttime nourishment, one older (the early birds) and one younger (the night owls). Another hypothesis is that the two groups are simply running on different internal body clocks, which affects when they want their evening calories.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Further studies are needed to reveal the real answer. In the meantime, you might want to listen to your guts and keep your laptop handy for when it’s time to start searching. wonderlandstock/Alamy Stock Photo center_img By Frankie SchembriJul. 24, 2018 , 7:01 PMlast_img read more

Indian cricket’s new folk tale: Rise of Mahendra Singh Dhoni

first_imgAIRBORNE: M.S.Dhoni’s power to finish matches with sixes has India in thrallIn Ranchi, they already have some heavy duty heroes, you know. The airport is named after Birsa Munda, a tribal freedom fighter.The town’s main road pauses at Albert Ekka Chowk, where the lance naik who won the Param Vir,AIRBORNE: M.S.Dhoni’s power to finish matches with sixes has India in thrallIn Ranchi, they already have some heavy duty heroes, you know. The airport is named after Birsa Munda, a tribal freedom fighter.The town’s main road pauses at Albert Ekka Chowk, where the lance naik who won the Param Vir Chakra stands in bronze readiness. As these are not such conflict-ridden times, inspiration is found in less lofty things. Broken windows for instance. “You see them. That’s him,” says Sambhav Diwan, final year BCom student pointing to rows of shattered glass panes on one flank of the DAV Shyamali School. It seems impossible. The building is 250 m hit from the centre of the MECON cricket ground near it. How could anyone keep targeting it, smashing one pane in three?MANIA: M.S.Dhoni’s first pitchActually, it hardly matters whether it’s one window or twenty-one. What matters is how Mahendra Singh Dhoni, for it is his handiwork that is being discussed, did it at all. Got from here to there. The school’s cricket practice area, a long patch of mud outside the MECON ground, cannot possibly be a springboard to the India blue and all that it brings. Screaming crowds, stardom, Man of the Series, even a plasma TV. Somehow, from these safe, nondescript lanes that his father Paan Singh, retired pump operator, still cycles through, a cricketer of brightness, boldness and vigour has emerged. To metropolitan India, watching open-mouthed as one-day matches are finished with sky-ripping sixes, Dhoni is the team’s new find.To the place where he came from and others like it, Dhoni has become an idea so powerful that nothing can stop it. Not even the minefield of international cricket that lies ahead of the man himself.advertisementA six year old traineeCricket’s growing foot mark across India is reflected in the fact that the ODI team that thrashed Sri Lanka featured cricketers born in Allahabad, Kothamangalam, Rae Bareilly, Vishakhpatnam, and of course, Ranchi. S.S. Rao, Dhoni’s teammate in Jharkhand’s Ranji Trophy team says, “It doesn’t matter where you come from anymore, all that counts in cricket is performance.”Ten years ago, it would have been hard to find such assurance in the unfashionable backwaters of Indian cricket. Today, the unfashionable backwaters are crucibles of ambition and Dhoni is a prototype.A chatty, engaging 24-year-old Dhoni is aware how he and others like him have made all handicaps, like the lack of good wickets or year-round nets, irrelevant. “Guys from smaller places are tougher than those from the metros,” he says. Where he grew up, there was only one turf wicket, no big ticket academy, high-profile coach or modern gymnasium. In Ranchi, progress was always just around the corner. If you really wanted to progress, you went elsewhere.Dhoni has returned again and again to the town that the young usually leave. With his 650cc Yamaha Thunderbird motorcycle, bought secondhand. To cruise around in his new Scorpio with its black tinted windows. Or to inaugurate Ranchi’s first Subway outlet and Swift dealership. Every time he steps onto the field for India, it is an invigorating homecoming. Ranchi’s celebrationsThe day her baby brother scored his first ODI century, Jayanti Gupta recalls TV reporters stormed into his home. “They stood on the bed. We didn’t see a single ball after his 50,” she says. After Dhoni’s 183, Jharkhand selector and former India under-25 Pradeep Khanna says, “it was Holi-Diwali ek saath (together)”. Every time he plays, Dhoni’s parents lock up their little flat and go elsewhere to escape the arrival of the TV vans.In cricket, only the stardom is sudden. For most, careers move slowly. When switching from goal-keeping to wicket-keeping in school, Dhoni spent a year learning to keep without playing in a single match. As an 18-year-old he played matches during his Standard XII Board examinations. Gupta would read chapters out aloud to him at night and Dhoni would appear for the paper the next day. Often a car would be waiting outside the examination hall to take him to the railway station and his next match. Dhoni spent five seasons playing domestic cricket for before he was picked for India-A. Promoted to open on a tour in Zimbabwe, he made those watching sit up, including former India players Javagal Srinath and Saba Karim. “His ability to finish off matches is exceptional,” says Karim.m.S.Dhoni’s friends’ watchHis teammates reckon that Dhoni hits the ball harder than Virender Sehwag or Sachin Tendulkar. His school games teacher Keshab Banerjee had often to assure the principal that he would do “halka” practice because the people living in nearby buildings complained about balls landing in balconies and hitting walls.Banerjee reads out an inter-school scorecard: chasing 378 in 40 overs, Dhoni scored 213 not out in 150 balls with 26 fours and seven sixes. He once sent a six into his Sanskrit teacher’s house. In the Ranji Trophy Plate semi-final against Haryana last season, the ball had to be changed eight times because it kept landing outside Chandigarh’s Sector 16 Stadium. In Bangalore earlier this year, scooterists on Cubbon Road outside Chinaswamy Stadium gave thanks for their helmets as three monster hits cleared the stadium roof and its compound and crashed onto the road.advertisementIt is even said that when he was not picked for an under-19 World Cup camp, he sent the ball sailing through a window near where a selector was sitting.Where such power comes from is not clear. Genes say some, lots of school sport, suggest others but it might just be the milk. Till he was 18, Dhoni consumed a litre of milk a day, at various meals-as breakfast, as lunch with rice or with chapatis in the evening. Yet, he is neither the “orange-haired rustic” as one paper painted him, nor the “instinctive” player he may seem.Dhoni has never been formally coached by any single cricket guru but worked with a sampling of several. He would listen politely to everything said and then, he says, “choose what I wanted to follow”.Yet his improvisational shotmaking is based on precise thinking. The scoop shot to the fast bowlers is played when the fine leg is up and bowler is trying a yorker. He advises sagely, “I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone, you know. If you get it wrong you could get hit in the face because you’re leaning forward.”M.S.DhoniHe may be a small town boy but like his peers Dhoni is in sync with big-city ideas through school, TV and an alert mind. What about the city slicker hair-do? Dhoni knows about Samson from school and the circulating cliche makes him roll his eyes. It’s not about the coiffure. “Confidence is the key to my game,” he says.In the past, says Karim, through personal experience, the hinterland cricketer felt alienated and unwelcome in the Indian team due to the coldness of its seniors. Today the dressing room is a more democratic place and the playing field is finally very level.At the St Xavier’s School Ground, with its matting wicket and patchwork outfield of ankle high grass and bare mud, the Ranchi Cricket Academy is in session. This summer the coaches introduced a 10-overs-a-side format with their own rules. Three dot balls and you’re out. In the first 10 balls, two fours or a six was mandatory. “That’s the kind of player in demand today,” says coach Mohammed Wasim as one of his wards sends a six over the treeline.Coach Chanchal Bhattacharya has watched the A-Division league club teams increase from 30 to 40, within a year there will be a C Division opening up. In his camp, at least three youngsters in the first XI have stopped going to barbers.The word is spreading. In Kolkata, a mother checking her child’s Hindi homework was puzzled. In the middle of neat letters and pictures to go with them, among lotuses (ka for kamal) and rabbits (kh for khargosh) was a face framed by long hair.advertisement”What’s this?” the seven-year-old was asked. “Dh”, he replied, “For Dhoni.”last_img read more

Canada lawmakers declare Rohingya killings genocide

first_imgIn this file photo taken on 25 August 2018 Rohingya refugees perform prayers as they attend a ceremony organised to remember the first anniversary of a military crackdown that prompted a massive exodus of people from Myanmar to Bangladesh, at the Kutupalong refugee camp in Ukhia. Photo: AFPCanadian lawmakers on Thursday unanimously voted to declare Myanmar’s military against the Rohingya people a “genocide.”The House of Commons endorsed the findings of a UN fact-finding mission on Myanmar that found “crimes against humanity have been committed against the Rohingya” and that these acts were sanctioned by top Myanmar military commanders.In a motion, Canadian lawmakers said they “recognise that these crimes against the Rohingya constitute genocide” and urged the UN Security Council to refer the case to the International Criminal Court, while also calling for Myanmar’s generals to be investigated and prosecuted “for the crime of genocide.”“I want to underscore how tragic, how horrific the crimes against the Rohingya are,” foreign minister Chrystia Freeland said. “We are leading an international effort for justice and accountability for the Rohingya.”“Today’s unanimous motion is a very important step in that effort.”A brutal military campaign drove more than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar into neighbouring Bangladesh, where they now live in cramped refugee camps.Many have given accounts of extrajudicial killings, sexual violence and arson.Bangladesh and Myanmar signed an agreement last year to repatriate the Muslim minority—but it has stalled as the Rohingya fear returning to Rakhine without their safety and rights guaranteed.last_img read more

Massive brown dwarf detected by astronomers

first_img 2019 Science X Network An international team of astronomers has found a new brown dwarf, one of the most massive objects of this type discovered to date. The newly detected brown dwarf, designated EPIC 212036875 b, turns out to be about 50 times more massive than Jupiter. The finding is detailed in a paper published June 13 on arXiv.org. Brown dwarfs are intermediate objects between planets and stars. Astronomers generally agree that they are substellar objects occupying the mass range between 13 and 80 Jupiter masses. Notably, out of the 2,000 brown dwarfs so far detected, only about 400 of them were found to be circling around stars.Observations have shown that brown dwarfs with masses between 35 and 55 Jupiter masses orbiting their hosts at a relatively close distance (less than 3.0 AU) are extremely rare and difficult to find. This so-called “brown dwarf desert” is constantly studied by astronomers using various techniques, aiming to find other examples of this peculiar type.Now, an international group of researchers led by Carina M. Persson of Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden reports the finding of a new massive brown dwarf, apparently another representative of this desert. The new object, designated EPIC 212036875 b, was identified by NASA’s prolonged Kepler mission known as K2, and Persson’s team confirmed its brown dwarf nature using ground-based telescopes.”In this paper, we report the independent discovery and observations of EPIC 212036875 b performed by the KESPRINT consortium,” the paper reads as the detection of this object was almost simultaneously reported by other group of astronomers.According to the study, EPIC 212036875 b is about 51 times as massive as Jupiter, but approximately 17 percent smaller than our solar system’s gas giant. These values imply the brown dwarf’s mean density at a level of around 108 g/cm3.Observations conducted by Persson’s team found that EPIC 212036875 b orbits its host approximately every 5.17 days at a distance of about 0.06 AU from it. These results confirm that the newfound object represents the brown dwarf desert. Such a close orbit also means that the brown dwarf should be relatively hot—its equilibrium temperature is estimated to be about 1,450 K.The study reveals that the host, EPIC 212036875, is a slightly evolved star of spectral type F7 V, about 41 percent larger and 15 percent more massive that the sun. Its age was estimated to be around 5.1 billion years and its effective temperature was measured to be 6,230 K.In concluding remarks, the researchers ponder the possible formation and evolution scenarios for EPIC 212036875 b. They assume that this brown dwarf most likely formed due to gravitational instabilities in a protoplanetary disc.”We argue that EPIC 212036875 b formed via gravitational disc instabilities in the outer part of the disc, followed by a quick migration. Orbital tidal circularisation may have started early in its history for a brief period when the brown dwarf’s radius was larger,” the astronomers concluded. More information: Carina M. Persson et al. Greening of the Brown Dwarf Desert. EPIC 212036875 b—a 51 MJ object in a 5 day orbit around an F7 V star. arXiv:1906.05048v2 [astro-ph.EP]. arxiv.org/abs/1906.05048 Transit light curve folded to the orbital period of EPIC 212036875 b. The K2 photometric data is indicated with the red points, and the best-fitted transit model with the solid black line. The residuals of the fit are shown in the lower panel. Credit: Persson et al., 2019. Another brown dwarf in the system? Study investigates properties of HD 206893 Explore further Citation: Massive brown dwarf detected by astronomers (2019, June 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-massive-brown-dwarf-astronomers.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more