Kerr felt Scotland were denied penalty against Japan

first_imgScotland boss Shelley Kerr felt her side should have been awarded a penalty in the 2-1 Women’s World Cup loss to Japan in Rennes.As the Scots applied pressure late on, Erin Cuthbert appealed that Risa Shimizu had handled in the box but no spot-kick was given.When asked about the incident, Kerr said in her post-match press conference: “It’s not a hard luck story but I’ve actually watched it back three times, and it’s a penalty.“There’s no other comments to make on it, it’s a penalty.” Scotland’s second defeat in Group D followed a similar pattern to their first – the 2-1 loss to to England five days earlier – with them going 2-0 down in the first half before improving after the break and pulling a goal back in the closing stages of the game.Japan, the 2011 winners and 2015 runners-up who had been held to a 0-0 draw by Argentina in their opening game, took the lead in the 23rd minute at Roazhon Park via a Mana Iwabuchi strike as an error by Scotland captain Rachel Corsie was punished.The advantage was then extended in the 37th by a penalty won and converted by Yuika Sugasawa, who went down in the box when Corsie put her hand on her shoulder.Scotland’s subsequent rally saw Cuthbert hit a post in the 78th minute, then have two penalty claims turned down before substitute Lana Clelland’s fine strike made it 2-1 with two minutes of normal time remaining. Scotland, who are at a Women’s Word Cup finals for the first time, need to beat Argentina in their final group game on Wednesday to have a chance of progressing into the last 16.Kerr said: “We obviously conceded two bad goals, mistakes. Take that out of the game and it’s much closer.“Huge credit to Japan. I think we saw the real Japan today, their movement was incredible.“We knew it would be, we tried to set up in a way to stop them and in spells of the game we didn’t do that, which sometimes can be understandable because you’re playing against world-class players.“But I thought in the second half, for most of it we were terrific, and we finished really strongly.“I’m immensely proud of the players, because it’s their first World Cup and playing against England first and then Japan and you narrowly lose to both.“We need to build on it, we need to rest again and get ready for a big game against Argentina.”Japan boss Asako Takakura said in quotes reported on FIFA’s official website: “It was a must-win game and, although there were tough moments, we’re very happy to get the win.“We had to be aggressive and score goals, and that’s what we did. We didn’t show our true selves in the first game at this tournament but this was a lot more like the true Japan.“I expect a lot of my players and today we managed to win against a wonderful Scottish team. But at the same time, we can still improve certain aspects of our game and we will keep discussing how to do that.”last_img read more

Grand opening for Cascades Casino Chatham

first_imgHundreds showed up to Thursday’s grand opening of Cascades Casino Chatham.As people filled the gaming floor on one side of the building, local politicians and executives from Gateway Casinos and Entertainment Ltd., Cascades’ parent company, spoke to a crowd inside the Match Eatery before the ribbon cutting at the casino’s official opening.Chatham-Kent-Leamington MPP Rick Nicholls said it was a “beautiful day inside Cascades Casino.”Steve Rowbotham, the casino’s general manager, said he was proud of the 200 jobs the casino created, many of which are employees coming over from Cascades Casino Dresden, and the $36-million investment Gateway put into the casino.The casino is the first completely new, ground-up build that Gateway has done in Ontario. The company’s three other current casino locations were built or renovated in existing structures.“This property allowed us to actually build what we would build, what we wanted to build, and showcase the features as we would,” said Bradley Bardua, Gateway’s CEO. “This property is key for us in Ontario. It’s the first of a series of new builds.”Bardua said the grand opening was meant to introduce the facility to the community and guests. He said there will be more events going on at the casino in the coming days and weeks.“It’s really all about bringing the community to the site this week,” he said.NHL players Max Domi and T.J. Brodie will be at the casino on Friday for a meet and greet. They will also accept a cheque for $2,000 from Gateway Gives, the company’s charity organization, for juvenile diabetes research.The Chatham-Kent Hospice Foundation was selected by the employees of the casino to be the beneficiary of all the grand opening ceremonies. From Aug. 8 to Sept. 6, $2 from every Tropic Thunder pizza and $1 from every Sons of Kent draft beer sold at the casino will go toward the hospice foundation.Mayor Darrin Canniff said it was a great coming together of the community, Gateway and the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Association (OLG).“We worked so well together to create this wonderful facility,” he said.The OLG donated $884,638 to the Municipality of Chatham-Kent at the grand opening.Jim Bultje of Chatham said the casino was “pretty spectacular.” As a local home builder, he’s glad to see the 200 jobs come to the city.“We hope to build some houses for people who are moving to Chatham for the casino,” he said. “We’re not into gambling, but we’re definitely into eating and the food here is just fantastic.”Jeanine Foulon, a Chatham resident, said she enjoys the convenience of the casino.“I was here last Friday and the place was just a hoppin’,” she said. “It’s very welcoming and I’m glad it’s here.”last_img read more

Macon County Fugitives Captured in Virginia

first_imgIn a coordinated effort with the Macon County Sheriff’s Office, United States Marshal Service and multiple local law enforcement agencies in Virigina, wanted Macon County fugitives Natasha Dehart and Gerald Shope were arrested in the morning hours of March 13th at a residence in Wytheville Virginia. Utilizing information obtained by Detectives with the Macon County Sheriff’s Office, the United States Marshals were able to develop a location on Dehart and Shope. After Dehart and Shope refused to come to the door of the residence, a search warrant was obtained and forcible entry into the residence was initiated. Both Dehart and Shope were arrested in a bedroom within the residence and have now been taken into custody.Dehart and Shope are currently detained at the Wythe County Sheriff’s Office Detention Center pending extradition proceedings.last_img read more

South Africans help flood-stricken nations

first_img20 January 2015Relief parcels have been distributed to flood-hit families in Malawi by the South African humanitarian group, Gift of the Givers.The parcels – worth R500 each – contained staple food, blankets, eating utensils, water purification tablets and plastic sheets, the organisation’s founder, Imtiaz Sooliman, said on 17 January.The eight-member Gift of the Givers team reached areas more than 100km away from Blantyre, he added. Distribution would also be carried out in Chikwana, Nsanje, Mangochi, Machinga, Balaka, Zomba, Phalombe and Mulanje regions.Continuous rain and the “baby” Cyclone Bansi have resulted in Malawi declaring 15 of its 28 national districts disaster zones, and the country has called for international assistance. An estimated 100 000 people have been left homeless and 173 are confirmed dead.The death toll is expected to rise as it is believed that 183 people have been swept away from one village alone. In addition, 11 000 homes have been damaged.Sooliman said the southern African country was probably facing the “greatest flood disaster in the history of its existence”. “Massive destruction to agriculture, roads, bridges and general infrastructure, including power facilities, has complicated the situation due to prolonged power outages.“The Malawi defence force has already rescued more than 4 000 people with the fear that many more are trapped in inaccessible areas,” said Sooliman.There are also concerns of a cholera outbreak and other water-borne diseases as there is no clean drinking water and the sewerage system is contaminated. The humanitarian crisis is expected to worsen as tropical Cyclone Chedza hit Malawi on 18 January.“It is expected to be far more destructive than Cyclone Bansi, bringing more heavy rains and greater flooding,” said Sooliman. Gift of the Givers has put water rescue teams from South Africa on standby for this eventuality, and medical teams are also ready if required.Sooliman has urged South Africans to contribute to the relief efforts.Meanwhile, its rescue mission in Mozambique is progressing well, according to the South African National Defence Force (SANDF), which was deployed to the flood- stricken country after its government approached its neighbour for help.SANDF personnel left for Mozambique a week ago, and spokesman Lieutenant General Mabanga said the team was expected to spend seven to 14 days in that country. “Their stay will depend on the situation in that country.”Senior SANDF members would go to Mozambique on 20 January to assess needs.Tens of thousands of people have been displaced following torrential rains in Mozambique. Four people have died in Mocuba, one of two districts badly affected by flooding, while an estimated 5 000 have sought refuge in government shelters. According to reports, the waters have risen to double the flooding threshold.SANDF soldiers deployed in Mozambique include members of the South African Air Force, Navy divers and medical personnel. No SANDF members had been deployed in Malawi, Mabanga added.Source: SANewslast_img read more

‘Burning bodies’ experiment casts doubt on fate of missing Mexican students

first_img We should stop looking into the dump because that’s not what happened. The expert group called on Torero. Born in Peru and trained at the University of California, Berkeley, Torero has investigated many high-profile fires, including those that brought down the Twin Towers. The cartel members had testified that they incinerated the bodies on a pyre of wood and tires in the open air. Torero’s calculations suggested that fully incinerating 43 bodies in the manner the cartel described would have required a staggering amount of wood: between 20,000 and 40,000 kilograms. He also doubted that it would be possible to nearly eliminate organic matter from the remains with an open-air fire, rather than with a furnace. And when he visited the Cocula dump in July 2015, he saw no evidence of a massive fire. He concluded that it was impossible the students had been burned there.In an 8 June report, the Attorney General’s office called for experimental verification. Torero independently took up the challenge. He and a dozen students simulated the alleged pyres at Cocula in a field at his university’s Gatton campus, outside Brisbane. They used bone-dry wood, stacked precisely, and left out tires, which would have made the fire less efficient. The experimental set-up, Torero says, represented “the ideal scenario.”  Este artículo está disponible en español.MEXICO CITY—In September 2014, 43 university students disappeared in Guerrero state in southern Mexico. The Mexican government has maintained that a drug cartel murdered the students and burned their bodies at a trash dump. But forensic investigators and human rights groups were doubtful, citing gaps in the evidence and a federal investigation that they contend fell short of international standards. Now, a renowned fire scientist says his latest experiments rule out the government’s explanation once and for all.Using pig carcasses as a proxy for human bodies, José Torero, a fire scientist at the University of Queensland, St. Lucia, in Brisbane, Australia, incinerated up to four pigs at a time and determined that the inferno necessary to consume 43 bodies could not have occurred at the dump. “José knows what he’s doing,” says John Lentini, an independent fire investigator in Islamorada, Florida, who wasn’t involved in the research but has participated in other high-profile cases. “It doesn’t make any sense that you can make 43 people disappear like that.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Torero’s experiments “are one more element that says the so-called ‘historical truth’”—how a former attorney general labeled the government’s theory of the crime—“is impossible,” says Francisco Cox Vidal, a lawyer and member of an expert group (known in Spanish as the GIEI) convened by the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights in Washington, D.C., to examine the disappearance and the official inquest. Deputy Attorney General for Human Rights Eber Betanzos Torres did not respond to requests for comment. The missing students studied at the Ayotzinapa Normal School, a rural teacher’s college near Tixtla, Guerrero. On 26 September, a larger group of Ayotzinapa students hijacked commercial buses to travel to a protest in Mexico City, a common practice at the politically active school. According to confessions from members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel, the gang, abetted by local police, ambushed the students, possibly mistaking them for members of a rival cartel. Some students were killed by gunfire, some escaped, and 43 were kidnapped and allegedly executed. Cartel members said they incinerated the bodies in a municipal dump outside the town of Cocula. Six weeks later, federal investigators said they had found bags of human remains, burned to ash, in the dump and in a nearby river. His team systematically burned pig carcasses. Even when using 630 kg of wood for a single 70-kg pig, 10% of the pig’s flesh remained after the fire burned out, Torero told Science. Forty-three bodies of a similar weight, therefore, would have required over 27,000 kg of wood, and organic matter would have survived the fire. Even if the cartel had been able to find that much wood in Cocula, the intense bonfire would have scarred nearby tree trunks, Torero says. Visiting the dump 10 months after the disappearances, he saw no such scars.Torero also burned up to four pig carcasses at once to explore whether body fat would fuel the fire and promote total incineration. Each added carcass weakened fire intensity, the team found. Burning 43 bodies together, therefore, would require much more wood than burning each separately. “Bodies are a large percent water,” says Lentini. “They’re not great fuel.”Torero plans to submit his findings for peer review in the fall. In the meantime, he hopes his experiments will prod investigators in the grisly case to move beyond Cocula. “We should stop looking into the dump,” Torero says, “because that’s not what happened.”*Update, 15 September, 10:21 a.m.: On 14 September, Tomás Zerón de Lucio resigned as the head of the Attorney General’s criminal investigations division. He was a key figure in the government’s investigation, and the parents of the Ayotzinapa victims had long called for his dismissal.Hours later, President Enrique Peña Nieto appointed Zerón de Lucio as the technical secretary of the National Security Council.*Update, 14 September, 1:37 p.m.: On 13 September, the Attorney General’s (AG’s) office announced that it is expanding its investigation to examine the possible role of the state and federal police in the students’ disappearance. In a Spanish-language interview with Reuters, the new head of the investigation made no mention of the Cocula dump, nor of Torero’s experiments.A spokesman for the AG contacted Science in the evening of 13 September. In a statement, he said a panel of fire experts convened by the AG’s office in the spring had reached “the majority conclusion” that “a controlled fire had occurred in the Cocula dump, in which it was possible that human bodies had been burned.” José Torero participated in that panel, along with five other fire experts. The panel was confidential and its methods were never publicly released. Torero declined to discuss it with Science because he had signed a confidentiality agreement.When asked if the AG will continue to investigate the Cocula dump as a probable crime scene, the spokesperson said the AG’s office objectively evaluates all valid evidence and pursues all promising leads.Listen to a podcast on this article with author, Lizzie Wade.For more coverage on this topic, check out our Forensics feature package. *Update, 22 May 2018, 10:10 a.m.: The results of José​ Torero’s study have now been published in the Fire Safety Journal. José Torero, fire scientist at the University of Queensland, St. Lucia, in Brisbane, Australia center_img The ash was sent to a lab at the University of Innsbruck in Austria. Almost all the organic matter in the ash had burned away, but the lab eventually recovered DNA of two missing students in remains from the river. In April 2016, the lab announced that it had not been able to link any of the other 41 students to the remains, nor to hair and clothing samples recovered from the dump. From the start, doubts plagued the Attorney General’s reconstruction of events. Basic facts, even the number of buses commandeered, differed in the official reports and the escaped students’ own accounts. (GIEI has theorized that unbeknownst to the students, one of the hijacked buses may have been used for drug running.) A group monitoring the investigation on behalf of the victims’ families has questioned the provenance and chain of custody of the ash bags. Human rights groups also suspect that the cartel members’ confessions were extracted under torture. Faced with international criticism, the Mexican government agreed to allow GIEI to investigate. ‘Burning bodies’ experiment casts doubt on fate of missing Mexican students By Lizzie WadeSep. 13, 2016 , 12:00 PMlast_img read more

Crime scene DNA could be used to reveal a suspect’s age—and whether they have cancer

first_img By Matt WarrenJul. 3, 2018 , 11:30 AM A drop of blood left by a suspect at a crime scene is a treasure trove for forensic scientists. Genetic information extracted from such biological samples can be compared against DNA databases to see whether a sample’s DNA sequence is a match for any known offenders, for example. To protect individuals’ privacy, these analyses, known as DNA fingerprinting, are normally restricted to parts of the genome not involved in creating proteins. But in some countries, investigators hoping to narrow down their pool of suspects are allowed to identify certain protein-coding sequences that can help predict skin or eye color. And soon, scientists may be able to find out even more from an offender’s DNA—including their age.A new forensic approach analyzes the chemical tags attached to DNA, rather than genetic sequences themselves. These molecules, which can switch genes on and off, get added onto DNA throughout our life span in a process called DNA methylation. And because the patterns of DNA methylation change as we age, they could provide a good indication of how old a suspect is.But this technique could inadvertently reveal a lot more about a suspect’s health and lifestyle, raising tricky legal and ethical questions that may demand new privacy safeguards, scientists suggest in a commentary in the July issue of Trends in Genetics. Science talked to two of the authors, Mahsa Shabani and Bram Bekaert of the University of Leuven in Belgium, who say that when it comes to this new world of forensics, “We have to just make sure that we’re not breaching any ethical boundaries, because we can get a lot more information than people actually realize at the moment.” The interview has been edited for length and clarity.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Crime scene DNA could be used to reveal a suspect’s age—and whether they have cancer Forensic scientists are now analyzing the chemical tags on DNA left in blood at crime scenes in order to predict the age of and other information about suspects, but this new technique raises privacy concerns.center_img zoka74/iStock.com Q: How did you get interested in the use of DNA methylation in forensics? Bram Bekaert: We saw that [clinical researchers] were able to associate DNA methylation patterns to chronological age, and extract some additional clinical information. And we started to develop our own simple assays … to estimate age for forensic purposes.Mahsa Shabani: We realised that this actually creates some potential for extracting more personal data, and this raised some ethical and legal concerns.Q: What kind of personal data? B.B.: There was one paper that recently came out where forensic scientists who had developed an age-prediction assay were actually showing they could determine whether individuals had chronic lymphocytic leukemia. That’s just a single example—methylation has also been associated with risk of mortality and all kinds of other pathologies.Q: Does a criminal who leaves behind DNA still have a right to protect their personal information?M.S.: This was one of the questions we were raising. If this method leads us to extract more and more information, what should be our criteria—when should we stop? You may argue that in this specific context any information that could help you to narrow down the [suspect] pool and find the “donor” of the samples … should not create any problem. But on the other hand … previous regulations have always been more restrictive in terms of what you can do with DNA samples.B.B.: DNA methylation is in part heritable … so that’s something we have to take into account as well. It’s not just about the privacy of the individual himself … it’s also about his son, his daughter, or his parents or his siblings.Q: In many countries, regulations prevent the use of DNA samples to predict identifiable information like hair or skin color. Why don’t those laws apply to this new method? B.B.: We are not actually looking at DNA sequences, so the law does not apply to this type of technology. We’re looking at the chemical compounds on top of the DNA sequence—that’s still what’s missing in the law. Right now, I can just look at all of these markers, without breaking the law, and determine whether somebody has cancer or not. So [the technology] has to be regulated or controlled in some kind of way.Q: What could that regulation look like?B.B.: We could limit our assay to just markers that reveal information on the chronological age and do not contain any information on medical issues. So markers that have been associated with cancer incidence should be left out—that would be one solution. The problem with that is that in order to get fairly high [age] accuracy you need more markers.The second approach could be to restrict the information that [a forensic scientist can give] to the police and to the magistrates, so you only provide the predicted age, based on a sample’s methylation values. In my opinion that would probably be the best solution.Q: Aside from age, what other useful information could DNA methylation tell forensic scientists? B.B.: Because DNA methylation is cell type–specific, we can use the patterns to determine what kind of cell we’re dealing with. For example, if I want to make sure that the stain that I’ve recovered from a crime scene is blood, I can use DNA methylation patterns … and you can do so for all kinds of bodily secretions and types of cells.Q: Are these tests being used in police investigations already?B.B.: Not really—most of them are still in the research stage, because when you want to use a forensic test it has to be validated and accredited. But they will come—without a doubt they will come—because police are really, really interested in those kinds of tests.Q: Are you optimistic that they will turn out to be useful forensic tools?B.B.: I’m very convinced that these kinds of tools do have their purpose. … We both support these kinds of tests, we have to just make sure that we’re not breaching any ethical boundaries, because we can get a lot more information than people actually realize at the moment.last_img read more

The Who To Donate Song Royalties To Teen Cancer America

first_imgOn April 7, The Who will release a collectible blue vinyl 7″ of their latest classic ‘Be Lucky’ from ‘The Who Hits 50!’ album backed with the band’s very first single from 1965 ‘I Can’t Explain.’‘Be Lucky’ is The Who’s first new material in eight years and in keeping with their ongoing support for Teenage Cancer charities, the band have donated their royalties from the song to Teen Cancer America, a charity founded in 2011 by Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend.The Who will also bring “THE WHO HITS 50!” tour to North America this year. “THE WHO HITS 50!” tour will kick off its spring run on April 15 in Tampa, FL and will include 21 stops throughout the east before wrapping on May 30 in Forest Hills, NY. The fall leg will launch September 14 in San Diego, CA and begin with West Coast dates throughout the U.S. and across Canada before concluding November 4 in Philadelphia, PA. Tickets are on sale now; more information can be found at thewho.com/tour. In addition, $1 from each ticket sold on “THE WHO HITS 50!” North American tour will benefit Teen Cancer America.last_img read more

Jeff will be part of both the Road Scholars prog

first_imgJeff will be part of both the “Road Scholars” program, which connects experts to an inquiring public in communities throughout Arizona, and the “Speakers in the Schools” program that provides lecturers for free to K-12 curricula throughout the state. January 24, 2014Cosanti Foundation president Jeff Stein has been named to the Arizona Humanities Speaker’s Bureau.Arizona Humanities is an arm of the National Endowment for the Humanities that supports scholars and discussions of cultures, peoples and histories of the state, and now, discussions of Arcosanti and Arcology.last_img read more

For the first time BBC Three is set to make all e

first_imgFor the first time, BBC Three is set to make all episodes from new series available on iPlayer before its linear transmission, as part of a simulcast agreement with ABC Australia’s internet TV service iview.New Australian Comedy series Jonah From Tonga will be available in its entirety on the BBC’s iPlayer from Friday 2 May for 48 hours – before it goes out on BBC Three, starting Thursday May 8.“This is BBC iPlayer’s first collaboration with an international broadcaster to create an online TV event,” said Victoria Jaye, head of TV content, BBC iPlayer. “We’re excited to see how this digital event sets light to social media activity from fans both here and on the other side of the world.”Last month, the BBC confirmed plans that it will close youth-skewing digital channel BBC Three in autumn 2015, moving some of the channel’s content to the iPlayer instead.last_img read more

Scripps has identified a substantial opportunity

first_imgScripps has identified a “substantial opportunity” for HGTV in Europe, and said that the global rollout of the channel is a “key priority”.Speaking on the company’s second quarter earnings call, Scripps CEO Kenneth Lowe said that the company would make more announcements about Home and Garden Television in Europe in “the coming months”.This follows the launch of HGTV in New Zealand in June and its debut last month in the Middle East and North Africa region in partnership with local pay TV operator BeIN Media Group.Discussing Scripps’ International Networks segment more generally, Lowe said that Polish broadcaster TVN has been a “transformative acquisition” that has turned this division into a “growing and profitable endeavour”.“Today, our international networks, including our TVN portfolio, are distributed in more than 175 countries and territories around the world and broadcast in 29 languages, all on our way to 300 million cumulative subscribers,” said Lowe.Scripps added that UKTV achieved a 10% share of commercial impacts for the first time in its history, and said that no impact is currently being seen from the UK’s ‘Brexit’ decision to leave the EU.Scripps International Networks’ operating revenues for Q2 were US$147.0 million (€133 million) compared with $22.1 million a year earlier. International Networks’ operating income was US$18.6 million, compared to a Q2 2015 operating loss of $13.1 million, while adjusted segment profit was US$37.4 million, compared with adjusted segment losses of $10.1 million last year –primarily due to the inclusion of TVN.US Networks advertising revenue was up 8.9% to US$541.0 million. However, distribution revenues for US Networks decreased by 3.6% to US$196.1 million and Scripps said that “continued erosion in subscribers across the industry also impacted revenue”.Overall Scripps reported consolidated operating revenues of US$892.8 million, a 21.9% increase from last year.last_img read more