TFA National Training Squads Announced

first_imgDean Springfield Rohit Prasad Sarah Peattie Tim Good Matt Prowse Jonathan Palau Jess McCall Leah Opie Kristin Boss Kristy Brennan Michael Law Oscar Sanft Danielle Davis Emilee Cherry Ashleigh Quinlan Charlotte Caslick Catherine Sargent Scott Buckley Willie Bishop Daniel Barton Lizzie Campbell Scott Bundy Tim Glazebrook Patricia Michaelopolous Nicole Beck Louise Winchester Kim Sue See Alicia Quirk Elin Mortimer Women’s Open Rob Nakhla Emily Hennessey Jordan Marshall Peta Rogerson Rachel Beck Sarah Spacie Marikki Wategocenter_img Peter Norman Kirsty Quince Cara Zaremski Sam Brisby Terry Deegan Jenna Hitch Trent Touma Kylie Hilder Dylan Thompson Steve Roberts Mixed Open Stay tuned to www.austouch.com.au for all of the latest news and information regarding the 2014 Trans Tasman Series. Related Filesnts_announcement_release-pdfRelated LinksNational Training Squads Leah Percy Touch Football Australia (TFA) is proud to announce its National Training Squads for the 2014 Trans Tasman Series against arch rivals New Zealand, which will take place in Mudgee, New South Wales in April, 2014.The Open teams (Men’s, Women’s and Mixed) will be looking to win back the prestigious Trans Tasman trophy following a loss to New Zealand in the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series, with the Women’s team the only side of the three to win their division.The squads consist of 18 players across the divisions yet to represent Australia at an Open’s level, with plenty of exciting up-and-coming talent selected in the squads following Australia’s Youth division clean sweep over New Zealand in the Super Trans Tasman Series. While there are some new faces in the squads, the teams will still contain a great deal of international experience, with the three Open’s teams combined comprising a total of more than 550 Australian Touch Football caps.Touch Football Australia wishes to congratulate the following players who have been named in the Australian squads: Melissa Peters Kristian Congoo Maddison Studdon Simon Lang Matt Tope Laura Peattie Justin Mitchell Dan Withers Luke Tonegato Lawrence Oberleuter Michael Chapman James Shute Claire Winchester Men’s Open Adam Pryde Sebe Rey Nick Good Stuart Brierty Dylan Hennessey Nicole McHugh Ben Moylanlast_img read more

a month agoSouthampton defender Maya Yoshida: I think we missed a huge opportunity

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Southampton defender Maya Yoshida: I think we missed a huge opportunityby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveSouthampton defender Maya Yoshida felt they missed a huge opportunity to capitalise on a ten-man Spurs after the 2-1 defeat at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.Saints found themselves on level terms after Danny Ings pounced on a Hugo Lloris mistake to equalise against a Spurs side who were down to ten men from the 31st minute.But the hosts soon went back in front, and Saints were unable to break them down for a second time after the interval, with Yoshida denied by a stunning Lloris save from the pick of the chances.“I think we missed a huge opportunity to win against a big team today,” the defender said.“Obviously it’s a huge disappointment for myself, but if we have the chance we have to take it, otherwise it will get more difficult.“After Aurier was sent off, we were too passive. We have to be much more aggressive, and after we conceded the second goal in a sloppy way, it became more difficult for us.“In the second half, we needed more creativity in the attacking third. They defended very well, but for myself, I needed to score from the corner kick.“Again, there was an opportunity and we couldn’t take it. Now it’s a really difficult situation for ourselves, but we cannot look behind us too much.“It’s another important game against Chelsea next week, so we’ll focus on that and keep going.” last_img read more

Now get old Twitter interface with few clicks

first_imgSan Francisco: A Twitter user and software developer, Zusor, has shared a useful ‘do-it-yourself’ guide to bring back the old Twitter interface with just a few clicks, and has named it ‘GoodTwitter’. To get the old interface, just open Twitter and follow these sequence of commands: Click on “(…) More” in the left-hand menu. Go to “Settings and privacy” > “About Twitter” > “Directory”. A new Twitter tab will open, click on “Home” and you will find the old user interface, The Next Web has reported. Also Read – Swiggy now in 500 Indian cities, targets 100 more this year So far, GoodTwitter has been downloaded by nearly 35,000 Chrome and Firefox users, attracting rave reviews on Reddit. Twitter recently redesigned the interface for its website version, saying the new look is faster and easier to navigate, but a lot of people are not liking it. The new version comes with an expanded Direct Messages section and the ability to let users switch between accounts faster and directly from the side navigation. It comes with new dark themes – Dim and Lights Out. As part of the redesign, while the Home, Explore, Notification and Messages options have been shifted to the left of the desktop, the trending section has been moved to the right of the screen.last_img read more

Judge reserves decision on request for order to remove Indigenous protest camp

first_imgThe Canadian PressA judge has reserved her decision on the request by the Saskatchewan government for an order to evict Indigenous protesters who have been camping in teepees on the legislature grounds.Justice Ysanne Wilkinson of Court of Queen’s Bench heard arguments Thursday from both sides on what should happen to the Justice For Our Stolen Children camp.The government contends the protesters are breaking bylaws and making it hard for the province to maintain the land across from the legislature building.“This case is not about whether the protesters are advocating for an honourable cause,” government lawyer Michael Morris told a packed courtroom.“It is not about whether there are too many Indigenous children in foster care. It is not about whether the criminal justice system is fair for Indigenous people.“This case is about the government’s ability to regulate, maintain land in Wascana Centre.”The first teepee went up six months ago and more have been set up as campers protest what they say is racial injustice and the disproportionate number of Indigenous children apprehended by child-welfare workers.Morris said the government has received several complaints about the camp and that public safety needs to be considered.The protesters were immediately told they had to leave.Morris said they were given numerous trespassing notices and police moved in June 18 to dismantle the camp. Six people were arrested but never charged.The camp was set up again two days later and police have held off ever since.Nine events have had to be relocated because of the camp, including part of the province’s Canada Day celebration.Protesters have filed a court application of their own seeking to have the six arrests made during the June eviction declared illegal.Meara Conway, a lawyer representing the protesters, said the arrests were a “dismal day for democracy in Saskatchewan.”Wilkinson is giving lawyer Dan LeBlanc, another lawyer representing the protesters, one week to submit further documents pertaining to his case against the arrests.LeBlanc told court Regina police Chief Evan Bray has already concluded the camp does not pose a safety risk. He added that the case is about freedom of speech.“The government bears the burden of convincing you that its infringement is justified,” LeBlanc said.Katrina Swan, a lawyer for the Regina Police Service, acknowledged that there was pressure on the police from the government to dismantle the camp in June.One of the arguments that government lawyers raised and was echoed by the judge is why the protesters never applied for a permit to stay on the legislative grounds.Outside court, LeBlanc said the judge will have to weigh that as she ponders her decision.“It’s true there’s no record of the people applying for permits before,” he said. “There’s certainly appeal level decisions from across Canada which say that’s not conclusive on the answer.”Also outside court, protester Richelle Dubois said that it’s important to have the camp on the legislature grounds.Her 14-year-old son, Haven, died in 2015 from what was ruled an accidental drowning. Dubois has never accepted that conclusion.“It’s a healing place for families like myself for the stories of situations like my son’s,” she said.last_img read more

Aphria chief executive and cofounder stepping aside from executive roles

first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:APHA)The Canadian Press LEAMINGTON, Ont. — Marijuana producer Aphria Inc. says chief executive Vic Neufeld and co-founder Cole Cacciavillani will be leaving their executive roles at the company, but will remain on the board.Neufeld says he and Cacciavillani will begin the transition process immediately, and at the appropriate time, they will both step down from executive positions at Aphria.The change comes as Aphria faces allegations by short-sellers questioning the company’s acquisitions in Colombia, Argentina and Jamaica. Aphria has denied the allegations, but established a special committee of independent directors to review the deals.Aphria also received a hostile takeover offer late last year from Ohio-based Xanthic Biopharma Inc., which does business as Green Growth Brands, that it rejected as being too low.The company reported today that revenue totalled $21.7 million in what was its second quarter as Canada’s legal recreational market began. The total was up from $8.5 million a year ago.Aphria earned a profit of $54.8 million or 22 cents per share for its quarter ended Nov. 30 compared with a profit of $6.5 million or five cents per share for the same period last year.last_img read more

17th Street Bridge in Dawson Creek closed due to high water levels

first_imgHenderson said that the city’s other bridges and culverts, including the one that was famously overtopped two years ago on 8th St., are currently faring well with the high water levels. He said that officials have so far not had any reports of damage to residents’ property. Henderson added however that the situation may change as water levels tend to peak in the late afternoon due to the warn daytime temperatures.As another precautionary measure, the City of Dawson Creek is handing out free sand bags for residents. The sandbags and sand will be made available at the west side of Kitchen Park, at the corner of 18th Street and 109th Avenue. Henderson said that although the creek is not expected to reach levels seen in prior floods, there may be some residents who could use sandbags to divert runoff.Updates can be found on the City’s Facebook page. DAWSON CREEK, B.C. — The City of Dawson Creek has closed the 17th Street Bridge because of rising water levels in the city’s namesake, though officials don’t believe that the water will rise to levels last seen two years ago.Dawson Creek’s General Manager of Development Services Kevin Henderson said the City decided to close the 17th Street bridge earlier today as a precautionary measure. Henderson explained that the water in Dawson Creek did overtop the bridge for a short time this morning, though it has since receded to approximately a foot below the road level.The bridge was one of several that were closed during the floods of June 2016, though it reopened a short time after.last_img read more

Province launches two reviews into BC Hydro over costs future of energy

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – The B.C. government has launched a two-phase review of BC Hydro in an effort to find cost savings and direction for the Crown utility.The first part of the review is expected to examine ways to save money within Hydro, create new revenue streams in an effort to keep rates low and give the corporation the resources it needs to provide electricity.An advisory group that includes staff from government ministries and BC Hydro will conduct the first review. The government says in a news release that it expects recommendations from the first phase of the review to be complete by this fall.It says the second phase of the review will build on new strategies from the first phase and include ways to ensure Hydro can maximize opportunities around the shift in global energy sectors.The expert panel conducting the second phase would aim to deliver its recommendation to the government by the summer or fall of next year.last_img read more

Oil surges and loonie rises but markets muted on new NAFTA deal

first_imgShares of Canada’s largest auto parts company, Magna International Inc., closed up 2.2 percent at $69.36, while Linamar Corp. was up 6.3 percent to $63.26 and Martinrea International Inc. was up 10.5 percent to $14.57.U.S. President Donald Trump had threatened to impose punishing auto tariffs on Canada if it didn’t reach a deal to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement.As a side deal to the new pact, called U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement, or USMCA, the Trump administration has agreed to exempt Canada if the United States imposes 25 percent tariffs on imported vehicles and auto parts.Excluding energy, the TSX likely fell as information technology led sectors on the downside with BlackBerry shares falling 5.1 percent. “It’s got to be good news for just about everybody but it is a bit of a muted response,” Michael Currie, vice-president and investment adviser at TD Wealth, said of the reaction to the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement.The energy sector led the market, rising two percent on the back of a 38-per-cent increase in MEG Energy Corp. shares following a hostile takeover offer by Husky Energy Inc. valued at $6.4 billion, including the assumption of $3.1 billion in debt.On top of that, reports have suggested LNG Canada, an estimated $40-billion gas liquefaction plant and pipeline that was delayed in 2016, could be officially sanctioned shortly.“We haven’t seen many deals out of the energy patch of this size in quite a while,” Currie said in an interview.Crude prices gained almost three percent Monday with the November crude contract up US$2.05 to US$75.30 per barrel.“If you are in the oilpatch you couldn’t ask for a better day.” TORONTO, O.N. – The price of oil hit a four-year high and the Canadian dollar rose to its highest level since May on Monday, but the reaction in North American markets to a tentative trade deal to replace NAFTA was pretty subdued.After rising sharply in early trading, markets ended the day moderately higher mainly due to the performance of the important energy sector in Canada and of General Electric Co. in the U.S.The S&P/TSX composite index hit a high of 16,193.06 but closed up just 31.29 points to 16,104.43.center_img The loonie was trading at an average of 78.11 cents US, up from an average of 77.25 cents US on Friday. That’s the highest level since May 22.The increase is directly attributable to the trade deal involving Canada, the United States and Mexico, said Currie, who noted that bank economists are predicting the loonie could head to the 80-cent range.Removing the trade uncertainty likely also means the Bank of Canada will increase its interest rate by 0.25 percentage.“It looks like full steam ahead for a rate hike this month and that pushes up the Canadian dollar too.”Meanwhile, in New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 192.90 points to 26,651.21. The S&P 500 index was up 10.61 points at 2,924.59, while the Nasdaq composite was down 9.05 points to 8,037.30.The November natural gas contract was up 8.6 cents at US$3.09 per million BTU’s.The December gold contract was down US$4.50 at US$1,191.70 an ounce and the December copper contract was down 1.75 cents at US$2.79 a pound.By Ross MarowitsTHE CANADIAN PRESSlast_img read more

CSIS gathered info on peaceful groups but only in pursuit of threats

first_imgA CSIS witness testified the spy service “is not in the business of investigating environmentalists because they are advocating for an environmental cause, period.”Still, another CSIS witness spoke of the need for “domain awareness” to identify “potential triggers and flashpoints” _ in part to ensure the service is aware of what is happening should a threat arise, the report says.Ultimately, the review committee concluded CSIS’s information collection fell within its mandate, and that the service did not investigate activities involving lawful advocacy, protest or dissent. The report indicates that any information on peaceful groups was gathered “in an ancillary manner, in the context of other lawful investigations.”The report also says there was no “direct link” between CSIS and the chilling effect groups mentioned in testimony before the committee. But after analyzing evidence and testimony, the committee concluded the fears of CSIS surveillance were unjustified.The heavily censored review committee report, completed last year and kept under wraps, is only now being made public because of the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association’s challenge of the findings in the Federal Court of Canada.In its February 2014 complaint to the CSIS watchdog, the association alleged the spy service had overstepped its legal authority by monitoring environmentalists opposed to Enbridge’s now-defunct Northern Gateway pipeline proposal.It also accused CSIS of sharing this information with the National Energy Board and petroleum industry companies, deterring people from expressing their opinions and associating with environmental groups.The review committee’s dismissal of the complaint has been known since September 2017, but a confidentiality order by the committee prevented the civil liberties association from releasing the report. As the association fights to overturn the dismissal, redacted versions of the detailed findings and related documents are being added to the public court record.The association, which became concerned about CSIS activities through media reports, told the committee of a chilling effect for civil society groups from the spy service’s information-gathering as well as comments by then-national resources minister Joe Oliver denouncing “environmental and other radical groups.” OTTAWA, O.N. – Canada’s spy service collected some information about peaceful anti-petroleum groups, but only incidentally in the process of investigating legitimate threats to projects such as oil pipelines, says a long-secret federal watchdog report.The newly disclosed report from the Security Intelligence Review Committee acknowledges concerns about a “chilling effect,” stemming from a belief that the Canadian Security Intelligence Service was spying on environmental organizations.Advocacy and environmental groups Leadnow, the Dogwood Initiative and the Council of Canadians are mentioned in the thousands of pages of CSIS operational reports examined by the review committee.center_img The civil liberties association considers some of the findings contradictory, pointing to the 441 CSIS operational reports deemed relevant to the committee’s inquiry, totalling over 2,200 pages.For instance, one of the largely censored CSIS records, now disclosed through the court, says the reporting was further to “the Service’s efforts in assessing the threat environment and the potential for threat-related violence stemming from (redacted) protests/demonstrations.”Another refers to the Dogwood Initiative as a “non-profit, Canadian environmental organization that was established in 1999 ‘to help communities and First Nations gain more control of the land and resources around them so they can be managed in a way that does not rob future generations for short-term corporate gain.”’The passages before and after the description are blacked out.“It’s our view that these documents demonstrate that CSIS was keeping tabs on these groups, even if they weren’t formal targets,” said Paul Champ, a lawyer for the civil liberties association.“But we maintain it’s unlawful to keep information on these groups in CSIS databanks when they are only guilty of exercising their democratic rights.”The committee report says CSIS should review its holdings to ensure it is keeping only information that is strictly necessary, as spelled out in the law governing the spy service.The report cites “clear evidence” CSIS took part in meetings with Natural Resources Canada and the private sector, including the petroleum industry, at the spy service’s headquarters, but says these briefings involved “national security matters.”The committee also concludes CSIS did not share information concerning the environmental groups in question with the National Energy Board or non-governmental members of the petroleum business.Even so, the perception of CSIS discussing security issues with the oil industry can “give rise to legitimate concern,” the committee report adds. “This needs to be addressed.”The committee urges CSIS to widen the circle of its public security discussions to include environmental and other civil society groups.(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

New natural gas plants will have to pay carbon tax on all

first_imgThe federal government is increasing the carbon tax on new natural-gas plants to discourage power companies from building them.The change is part of final regulations for the government’s carbon-tax system for big industrial greenhouse-gas emitters, which are being released this week.The system affects businesses that produce more than 50,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases a year. It is designed to limit impacts on competitiveness for major industrial emitters, who will pay the carbon tax on a portion of what they emit rather than on all the fuels that they use.The emission standard set for natural-gas power plants originally meant that new ones would likely never pay any carbon tax, which was a disincentive for power companies to turn to renewable-energy sources instead of gas.The change made this week means new natural-gas plants will have their emissions standard toughened each year after 2021, until in 2030 they will pay the carbon price on every ounce of their emissions.last_img read more