Bulls top Cavs, James moves on to 7th on NBA scoring list

first_imgPalace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Cleveland Cavaliers forward/center Tristan Thompson, right, battles for a rebound against Chicago Bulls guard Denzel Valentine, left, and guard Rajon Rondo during the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, March 30, 2017, in Chicago. The Bulls won 99-93. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)CHICAGO, ILLINOIS—LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers just might be at their lowest point since the King came home three years ago. Either way, they’ll have to do better than this if they’re going to be crowned again.Nikola Mirotic tied season highs with 28 points and six 3-pointers, Jimmy Butler scored 25, and the Chicago Bulls beat the Cavaliers 99-93 Thursday on a night when James moved into seventh place on the NBA’s career scoring list.ADVERTISEMENT Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home James entered needing 23 points to tie O’Neal and matched him when he scored on a layup with 7:29 left in the game. He took sole possession of seventh place when he hit one of three free throws to make it 90-83 with 4:28 remaining.But it was not an easy night for the Cavaliers.Kevin Love fouled out with eight points and 10 rebounds when he got whistled on a basket by Butler moments after James tied O’Neal.Rondo was able to get into the paint, particularly in the third quarter. That didn’t hurt Butler or Mirotic, who was connecting all game.“I definitely want to get back into the playoffs, and these young guys haven’t experienced it,” Rondo said. “I’m trying to push every day to find a way to get in. We can’t worry about other teams winning and losing. We need to go out every night and win these next seven to put ourselves in a position to get in.”Mirotic became the first Bulls player to hit six or more 3-pointers in back-to-back games. He is averaging 24.8 points over his past four games and has 20 3s in that span.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Rubio scores career-high as Wolves beat Lakers ‘Bad Boys for Life’ debuts so good with box office top spot MOST READ Duterte promises to look for funds to establish rail transport in Cebu Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite View comments James passed Shaquille O’Neal, finishing with 26 points. That gave him 28,599 for his career – three more than O’Neal. But the big night by the four-time MVP couldn’t prevent the Cavaliers from matching a season high with their third straight loss.That dropped the defending champions a half-game behind Boston for the Eastern Conference lead and left them with a 6-10 record in March.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return“Just in a bad spot right now,” said James, who had 10 rebounds and eight assists. “I’m not disappointed with the effort. Just in a bad spot. We need to figure it out.”For Mirotic, it was his second straight game with 28 points and six 3s. He also had 10 rebounds, finishing a strong March. Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town ‘1917’ takes top honor at the Producers Guild Awards “I feel it’s my time now. It’s never too late,” he said. “It’s a very important moment for the team.”Rajon Rondo added 15 assists, Robin Lopez had 10 points and 11 rebounds, and the ninth-place Bulls moved within a game of Miami and Indiana in the Eastern Conference standings.They also finished 4-0 against Cleveland to complete their first sweep of the Cavaliers since they took all three games during the 2011-12 season.Kyrie Irving scored 20 for the Cavaliers, while Tristan Thompson added 15 points and nine rebounds. But the Bulls dominated Cleveland 37-21 in the third quarter to wipe out a nine-point halftime lead and hung on down the stretch.“We won’t be perfect in one day,” Irving said. “But it’s no time to hold your head, I’ll tell you that. … We’re gonna be just fine. It’s ugly right now. It’s real, real ugly.”ADVERTISEMENT Wildlife rescuers asked to turn over animals to DENR ‘It’s not my shame’: Why Filipino women are calling out sexual misconduct on social media Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal tieslast_img read more

Around Whittier

first_imgMONTEBELLO – The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to award a rebuilding contract for the permanent replacement of the fire-destroyed Beverly Boulevard bridge, at a cost of $8.9 million. MCM Construction Inc., a Northern California-based company specializing in heavy freeway and bridge construction, was one of four companies that submitted bids ranging from $8.9 million to $10.6 million, according to county officials. The county’s Public Works Department, which is overseeing the project, will initiate the contract once the bridge’s co-owners have sent a deposit for their share of the cost. Each city is paying 10 percent of the bridge’s replacement tab. Training offered by Whittier PD WHITTIER – Citizens can learn about community oriented policing at a month-long training series being offered by the Whittier Police Department. Thursday is the last day residents can sign up for the training, which will give participants insights into how community policing works and how residents can assist law enforcement in safeguarding the community and improving residents’ quality of life. The workshop will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on March 6, 8, 13 and 14. To sign up, call Officer Robert Wood at (562) 945-8284 by Thursday. Salvation Army to hold open house WHITTIER – The Salvation Army of Whittier, 7926 Pickering Ave., invites the public to its open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday. The open house will provide information on renovations and upgrades to the facility. There also will be refreshments, tours and information. For more information, call (562) 698-8348. Board to hold special meeting WHITTIER – The Rio Hondo College board of trustees will hold a special meeting at 6 p.m. tonight in the board room on the campus, 3600 Workman Mill Road. The meeting will feature a building program update and a presentation by the cultural events program advisory committee. For more information, call (562) 692-0921. Whittier theater presents `Dancing’ WHITTIER – Whittier Community Theater presents Brian Friel’s “Dancing at Lughnasa” at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the Center Theater at the Whittier Community Center, 7630 S. Washington Ave. Tickets are $10 for adults and juniors under 18, and $8 for seniors 62 and older. For reservations, or for more information, call (562) 693-1105. School to hold fish fry fundraisers WHITTIER – St. Gregory the Great School, 13935 Telegraph Road, will hold its annual fish fry fundraising dinners from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. every Friday through the Lenten season, beginning Friday and continuing until April 7. The menu will include a generous portion of grilled fish, a large baked potato, homemade coleslaw, sweet corn and a roll. The cost is $7; $6 for seniors. A shrimp dinner is also available for $8 and cheese pizza for $3. All proceeds benefit the school. For more information, call (562) 941-0750. – From staff reports AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

NFL Coaches Yell At Refs Because It Freakin Works

In the first quarter of a scoreless 2016 AFC Championship game against the New England Patriots, Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos faced third-and-6 from their own 44-yard line. Wide receiver Demaryius Thomas ran a 15-yard out, breaking toward the Broncos’ sideline. He did not catch Manning’s wobbly throw, but there was contact on the play, and Denver’s players and coaching staff appealed to the official for a pass interference call on Patriots cornerback Logan Ryan. They got one, and the Broncos got a first down, scoring the game’s opening touchdown four plays later.On the ensuing drive, the Patriots faced third-and-3 at their own 27-yard line. Rob Gronkowski ran a wheel route up the Broncos’ sideline with T.J. Ward in coverage. As the Patriots tight end turned to look back for the ball, the defender made contact and shoved him, preventing a catch. Both Gronk and Tom Brady yelled for a penalty. The flag did not come, and the Patriots were forced to punt.Similar plays led to different outcomes that benefited the team on the sideline closest to the on-field action. Most NFL refs would likely say they are immune any sideline bias. “If I make a call because a coach is screaming at me on one side of the field and it’s wrong, that’s a bad day for me,” former NFL official Scott Green told us. (The NFL declined to comment.)But as it turns out, a sideline bias in the NFL is real, and it’s spectacular. To prove it, we looked at the rates at which refs call the NFL’s most severe penalties, including defensive pass interference, aggressive infractions like personal fouls and unnecessary roughness, and offensive holding calls, based on where the offensive team ran its play.1Some of this research was published in March in Economic Inquiry.For three common penalties, the direction of the play — that is, whether it’s run toward the offensive or defensive team’s sideline — makes a significant difference. In other words, refs make more defensive pass interference calls on the offensive team’s sideline but more offensive holding calls on the defensive team’s sideline. What’s more, these differences aren’t uniform across the field — the effect only shows up on plays run, roughly, between the 32-yard lines, the same space where coaches and players are allowed to stand during play.The following graphs show the penalty rates per 1,000 plays for defensive pass interference and aggressive defensive penalties, which include unnecessary roughness, personal fouls, unsportsmanlike conduct, and horse-collar tackles.2The data includes regular-season games between 2010 and 2014, and uses coin-toss information provided by Football Outsiders and play-by-play data from Armchair Analysis. To estimate penalty rates, we used a model of penalty outcomes that depends on yard line and which sideline (offensive or defensive team’s) the play was closer to. Additional methodological details can be found here. So what could be causing this phenomenon?Refs are faced with a near-impossible task. They make judgment calls in real time, relying on just their eyes and their experience. Deprived of the advantages, like instant replay, that we enjoy from the couch, refs have less information to help them resist the normal subconscious urge to draw on external cues for assistance in making borderline calls. In psychology terms, this process is called cue learning. It’s why we laugh longer in the presence of other humans laughing,4Which, in turn, is the reason that many TV comedies use a laugh track. why we eat more in the presence of overweight company, and why our judgment of persuasive speeches is influenced by the audience’s reaction.The most common cue in sports is crowd noise, and because crowd noise almost always supports the home team, the way the fans sway the referees is the No. 1 driver of home-field advantage in sports. And one notable experiment suggests that how loud a crowd is helps refs decide whether an interaction should be penalized. A pair of German researchers showed actual referees old video clips of possible soccer infractions, with crowd noise played at high or low volume. Refs looking at the exact same interactions were more likely to hand out a yellow card when they heard a lot of crowd noise than when the volume was low.It follows, then, that screaming and hat-throwing football personnel may also have an effect on referee choices. In football, this sideline bias even seems to supersede refs’ tendency to support the home team: The differences in the penalty rates from sideline to sideline are several times larger than the differences in penalty rates between the home and away teams.That bias can affect the outcome even when officials have time to confer. In a 2015 playoff game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Detroit Lions, Matthew Stafford threw a third-and-1 pass to Brandon Pettigrew. Officials initially called defensive pass interference on the Cowboys’ Anthony Hitchens.But the flag occurred right in front of the Cowboys sideline. This led to some confusion. It also led to a helmetless Dez Bryant yelling at the official.After conferring with each other, the officials picked up the flag, a decision that Mike Pereira, Fox Sports’ rules analyst and the NFL’s former vice president of officiating, said was incorrect. Brian Burke of Advanced Football Analytics calculates that when the official picked up the flag, the Lions’ chances of winning that game dropped by 12 percentage points.Dallas won 24-20.Check out our latest NFL playoff predictions. Refs throw flags for defensive infractions at significantly higher rates when plays are run in the direction of the offensive team’s sideline; near midfield, defensive penalties are called about 50 percent more often on the offensive team’s sideline than the defensive team’s. Close to the end zone, where the sidelines are supposed to be free of coaches and players, these differences are negligible.For offensive flags, that association is reversed, at least on holding penalties.3Offensive pass interference calls didn’t vary by proximity to either team’s sideline. Here’s the rate of holding calls made on outside run plays, which shows how the defensive team’s sideline can help draw flags on the offense. Around midfield, offensive holding gets called about 35 percent more often on plays run at the defensive team’s sideline. read more

Keith Burant Changes Plea GUILTY

first_img Related Items:keith burant, meridian trust, royal turks and caicos police force Recommended for you Historic Day: Hon. Dr. Rosita Butterfield with State Recognized Send off Nearly 100 Haitian migrants caught by TCI Police Marine division Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp 47-year-old man makes fifth murder for TCI Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales – Meridian Bank and Trust, Managing Director, Keith Burant singing a different song in court this morning… no longer saying he is not guilty of obstruction; assaulting a police officer while executing his duties, using abusive language and resisting arrest but now saying he is guilty… and getting 30 days probation to maintain good behaviour and that’s all for confessing to those four charges stemming from the Queen’s Birthday Parade confrontation with members of the Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police Force. The row was over parking at the field, his rugby field where the honors parade was being held and where Burant was told to remove his vehicle which was said to be blocking the Acting Premier’s vehicle. last_img read more

Priests as predators Long history of abuse in Indian churches

first_imgIn this photo taken on 4 November in 2018, Sister Josephine Villoonnickal, left, Sister Alphy Pallasseril, centre, and Sister Anupama Kelamangalathu, who have supported the accusation of rape against Bishop Franco Mulakkal, talk at St Francis Mission Home, in Kuravilangad in southern Indian state of Kerala. Photo: APThe stories spill out in the sitting rooms of Catholic convents, where portraits of Jesus keep watch and fans spin quietly overhead. They spill out in church meeting halls bathed in fluorescent lights, and over cups of cheap instant coffee in convent kitchens. Always, the stories come haltingly, quietly. Sometimes, the nuns speak at little more than a whisper.Across India, the nuns talk of priests who pushed into their bedrooms and of priests who pressured them to turn close friendships into sex. They talk about being groped and kissed, of hands pressed against them by men they were raised to believe were representatives of Jesus Christ.”He was drunk,” said one nun, beginning her story. “You don’t know how to say no,” said another.At its most grim, the nuns speak of repeated rapes, and of a Catholic hierarchy that did little to protect them.The Vatican has long been aware of nuns sexually abused by priests and bishops in Asia, Europe, South America and Africa, but it has done very little to stop it, The Associated Press reported last year.Now, the AP has investigated the situation in a single country — India — and uncovered a decades-long history of nuns enduring sexual abuse from within the church. Nuns described in detail the sexual pressure they endured from priests, and nearly two dozen other people — nuns, former nuns and priests, and others — said they had direct knowledge of such incidents.Still, the scale of the problem in India remains unclear, cloaked by a powerful culture of silence. Many nuns believe abuse is commonplace, insisting most sisters can at least tell of fending off a priest’s sexual advances. Some believe it is rare. Almost none, though, talk about it readily, and most speak only on the condition they not be identified.But this summer, one Indian nun forced the issue into the open.When repeated complaints to church officials brought no response, the 44-year-old nun filed a police complaint against the bishop who oversees her religious order, accusing him of raping her 13 times over two years. Soon after, a group of her fellow nuns launched a two-week public protest in India’s Catholic heartland, demanding the bishop’s arrest.It was an unprecedented action, dividing India’s Catholic community. Inside the accuser’s convent in rural Kerala state, she and the nuns who support her are now pariahs, isolated from the other sisters, many of whom insist the bishop is innocent. The protesting nuns get hate mail and avoid going out.”Some people are accusing us of working against the church, of being against the church. They say, ‘You are worshipping Satan,'” said one supporter, Sister Josephine Villoonnickal. “But we need to stand up for the truth.”Villoonnickal has been a nun for 23 years, joining when she was a teenager. She scoffs at the idea that she wants to harm the church.”We want to die as sisters,” she said.Some nuns’ accounts date back decades — like that of the sister, barely out of her teens, who was teaching in a Catholic school in the early 1990s.It was exhausting work, and she was looking forward to the chance to reflect on what had led her — happily — to convent life.”We have kind of a retreat before we renew our vows,” she said, sitting in the painfully neat sitting room of her big-city convent, where doilies cover most every surface, chairs are lined up in rows and the blare of horns drifts in through open windows. “We take one week off and we go for prayers and silence.”She had travelled to a New Delhi retreat centre, a collection of concrete buildings where she gathered with other young nuns. A priest was there to lead the sisters in reflection.The nun, who like others interviewed for this story spoke on condition she not be identified, is a strong and forceful woman who has spent years working with India’s poor and dispossessed, from battered wives to evicted families.But when she talks about the retreat her voice grows quiet, as if she’s afraid to be overheard in the empty room: “I felt this person, maybe he had some thoughts, some attraction.”He was in his 60s. She was four decades younger.One night, the priest went to a neighbourhood party. He came back late, after 9:30 pm, and knocked at her room.”‘I need to meet you,'” he said when she cracked open the door, insisting he wanted to discuss her spiritual life. She could smell the alcohol.”You’re not stable. I’m not ready to meet you,” she told him.But the priest forced open the door. He tried to kiss her. He grabbed at her body, groping wherever he could.Weeping, she pushed him back enough to slam the door and lock it.It wasn’t rape. She knows it could have been so much worse. But decades later she still reels at the memory, and this tough woman, for a few moments, looks like a scared young girl: “It was such a terrifying experience.”Afterward she quietly told her mother superior, who allowed her to avoid other meetings with the priest. She also wrote an anonymous letter to church officials, which she thinks may have led to the priest being re-assigned.But nothing was said aloud. There were no public reprimands, no warnings to the many nuns the priest would work with through his long career.She was too afraid to challenge him openly.”I couldn’t imagine taking that stand. It was too scary,” she said. “For me it was risking my own vocation.”So the fierce nun remained silent.Catholic history is filled with women who became martyrs to their own purity: Saint Agatha had her breasts torn off for refusing to marry; Saint Lucy was burned alive and stabbed in the throat for defending her virginity; Saint Maria Goretti was 11 years old when she was killed by a man who tried to rape her.”It is a sin!” Maria is said to have cried out. “God does not want it!”But for a nun, fighting off a priest’s advances means pinballing through centuries-old sexual and clerical traditions. Celibacy is a cornerstone of Catholic religious life, as is sexual purity among nuns. Many nuns say a sister who admits to a sexual experience — even if it’s forced — faces the risk of isolation within her order, and possibly even expulsion.”You’re not sure if you’ll be kept in your congregation, because so much is about your vow of chastity,” said Sister Shalini Mulackal, a New Delhi-based theologian. “That fear is there for the young ones to disclose what has happened to them.”At the same time, priests are seen as living representatives of Christ, with obedience to them another Catholic cornerstone.Then there is the isolation of young women struggling to find their way in new communities after leaving their homes.Caught at this intersection of sexual taboo, Catholic hierarchy and loneliness, sisters can be left at the mercy of predatory priests.”There’s a lot of emotion bottled up and when a little tenderness is shown by somebody it can be so easy for you to cross boundaries,” said Sister Dorothy Fernandes, who has spent years working with the urban poor in eastern India. “It can be hard to tell what is love and what is exploitation.”It’s particularly hard for sisters from Kerala, a deeply conservative region long the birthplace of most Indian nuns. Sex is rarely mentioned openly in small-town Kerala, boys and girls are largely kept apart, and a visible bra strap can be a minor crisis for a young woman.”Once you grow up, once you get your first menstruation, you are not encouraged to speak normally to a boy. And the boys also vice-versa,” said a nun from Kerala, a cheerful woman with sparkly glass earrings and an easy smile. She remembers the misery of Sunday mass as an adolescent, when boys would stand outside the church to watch girls filing in, eyes crawling over their young figures. “We have a terrible taboo about sex.”That naivety, she said, can be costly.Like the time she was a novice nun, still in her teens, and an older priest came to the Catholic centre where she worked. He was from Goa, a coastal region and former Portuguese colony.She shook her head: “I was in charge of visitors, and we had this bad habit of being hospitable.”At one point, she brought the priest’s laundry to his small room, where he was sitting. As she set down the clothes, he grabbed her and began to kiss her.At first, she had no idea what was happening.”The kissing was all coming here,” she said, gesturing at her chest.The confusion of that day is still clear on her face: “I was young. He was from Goa. I am from Kerala. In my mind I was trying to figure out: ‘Is this the way that Goans kiss?'”She quickly understood what was happening but couldn’t escape his fierce grip. She also could not call out for help: “I cannot shout! He’s a priest.””I didn’t want to offend him. I didn’t want to make him feel bad,” she said.So she pushed herself away from him until she could slip out the door.She quietly told a senior nun to not send novices to the priest’s room. But, like the nun who fought the drunken priest, she made no official complaint.A complaint against a priest means leveling an accusation against someone higher in the church hierarchy. It can mean getting pulled into a tangle of malicious rumors and church politics. It means risking your reputation, and the reputation of your order.In the church, even some of those who doubt there is widespread abuse of nuns say the silence can be enveloping.Archbishop Kuriakose Bharanikulangara, a New Delhi-based church leader, calls incidents of abuse “kind of sporadic. Once here, once there.”But “many people don’t want to talk,” he continued. “They may talk in the community, but they don’t want to bring it to the public, to the court.”Speaking up can also risk financial troubles, since many congregations of nuns are financially subservient to priests and bishops.The silence is magnified in India by demographics, religious politics and a deep-seated belief that women have little value.There are roughly 18 million Catholics in India, but that’s a small minority in this largely Hindu nation of 1.3 billion. Speaking up could tarnish the image of their church, many nuns worry, and feed criticism by Hindu hardliners.”Even we, as religious sisters, even we try to keep it quiet,” said Mulackal, the theologian. “A woman who goes through this experience, she just wants to hide it and pretend everything is OK.”The rapes, the nun says, happened in Room 20 of a small convent at the end of a one-lane road in rural Kerala.Set amid rows of banana and rubber trees near the little town of Kuravilangad, the sisters at the St Francis Mission Home spend their days in prayer or caring for the aged. In the garden, a statue of the Virgin Mary overlooks a decorative fish pond the size of a child’s wading pool. The pond is covered in green scum.The rapist, she says, was the most powerful man in this tiny small world: Bishop Franco Mulakkal.Smart and ambitious, Mulakkal had risen from small-town Kerala to become a bishop in north India, overseeing a sprawling Catholic community. He was also the official patron of her community of 81 sisters, the Missionaries of Jesus, wielding immense influence over its budgets and job assignments.The nun is a friendly woman with jet black hair known for her quiet confidence. Every few months, she says, Mulakkal would visit the St. Francis convent and summon her. Then, according to a letter she wrote to church officials, he raped her.The letter says the first rape happened on 5 May, 2014. The last time was on 23 September, 2016. The dates are recorded in the convent’s visitor logs.Mulakkal angrily denies the accusations, telling reporters the charges were “baseless and concocted” and accusing the sister of trying to blackmail him into giving her a better job.”I am going through painful agony,” said Mulakkal, who was jailed for three weeks and released on bail in October. “I tell everyone to pray to God: Let the truth prevail.”Catholicism envelopes this part of Kerala. Towns are marked by their cathedrals, convents and roadside shrines, where the Virgin watches passing traffic or St George slays the dragon. Businesses proclaim their owners’ faith: St Mary’s Furniture and Bed Center; Ave Maria Electronics; Jesus Oil Industries.Around here, many see Mulakkal as a martyr.A string of supporters visited him in jail, and crowds greeted him when he returned home, a ring of policemen holding back people who showered him with flower petals. “Hearty Welcome!” a banner proclaimed.But at the St Francis convent, one group of nuns watched news reports about that welcome with dismay. While the sister leveling the accusations against Mulakkal does not speak publicly, a half-dozen nuns cluster around her, offering support and speaking on her behalf.”Nobody came to see sister, but so many people came to wait in line to meet Bishop Franco in jail,” said Villoonnickal, the nun, who moved back to Kerala to support the woman she calls “our survivor sister.”That sister was the second of five children in a Kerala family. Her father was in the army. Her mother died when she was in high school. Wracked with grief, she was sent to stay with a cousin – a priest – living in north India. Inspired by her time with him, she became a nun in 1994, working in her early years as a teacher.She knew Mulakkal, of course. Everyone in the Missionaries of Jesus knows him. But the two were never close, the accuser’s friends say, and had no consensual sexual relationship.It was about fear.”The bishop is such a powerful person and standing against him, where will she go?” asked Villoonnickal. “If she went home what will happen to her?””Many times she was telling him to stop. But each time he was forcing himself on her,” she continued.Eventually, they say, she told some sisters what was happening. Then she says she repeatedly complained to church authorities. When nothing happened, she went to the police.She also went to confession.There, according to the other nuns, she was told she had to resist the bishop.”‘Even if you have to die, don’t submit yourself.'” the priest told her in confession, according to Villoonnickal. “‘Be courageous.'”Catholic authorities have said little about the case, with India’s Catholic Bishops’ Conference saying in an October statement that it has no jurisdiction over individual bishops, and that the investigation and court case, which could take many years, must run their course.”Silence should in no way be construed as siding with either of the two parties,” the group said. “We request prayers for the Church at this difficult time.”In Malayalam, the language of Kerala, sisters who leave the convent are sometimes marked as “Madhilu Chadi” — Wall Jumpers. It’s a mocking term for the sexually frustrated and is often used for nuns and priests who have fled religious life.Those who stay get respect. They have communities that embrace them. Their lives have direction, purpose. Those who leave often find themselves adrift in India, searching for new identities and spurned by families and friends. The events that knit families together — weddings, funerals, reunions — are suddenly off-limits. The emotional toll can be immense.Speaking up about the church’s troubles, many nuns say, could end with them forced from their convents, cut off in many ways from what they’ve always known.”It’s a fear of being isolated if I speak the truth,” said the nun who fought off the drunken priest. “If you do that, you have to go against your own community, your own religious superiors.”The result is an engulfing silence. Silence is the armor that sisters use to protect themselves and the lives they have created, even if it also means struggling with their memories, and protecting the men who abused them.In the end, most say nothing.”I didn’t tell anybody,” said the nun who escaped the priest kissing her chest, and who waited many years to talk about what had happened to her. “So you understand how these things are covered up.”last_img read more

The heart and soul of music

first_imgLiving up to their tradition of being one the best live-misc destinations in the Capital, Hard Rock Cafe at Saket made sure they kept the volumes loud. The music band, Soul’d Out performed today at Hard Rock Cafe.The idea of the summation of the band floated about for quite a while until its formation in the summer of 2011.The band consists of four members who belong to the same college, Rohit, Bhannu, Abhay and Abhijit. Each member of the band has a very special relationship with music. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’With influences ranging over different genres of music, Soul’d Out quite naturally has a very interesting sound, and the members are not concerned about how that sound is defined or categorised.All that matters to them is that they have fun playing, which eventually spreads contagiously into the crowd! Whether you’re in the mood to bust a move, or just chill out with some friends over a few beers, this band can certainly leave you satisfied!Abhijt Sood played the drums, Bhaanu Mehendiratta was on the guitar, Chetan Awasthi handles the vocals, Sajal Sharma plays the bass and Abhay Sharma, the saxophone.last_img read more

35yearold woman killed in accident

first_imgKolkata: A chaos broke out on Purulia-Raghunathpur State Highway on Sunday morning following a road accident in which a 35-year-old woman was killed.An irate mob went on rampage, ransacking a police vehicle following the accident.Locals staged a demonstration and put a road block at Padalara village in Purulia at around 6 am protesting against the reckless driving of vehicles.The victim has been identified as Bisakha Mahata (35). She was walking along the road to get drinking water from a nearby area at the time of the accident. According to police, the woman was hit by a pickup van at Padalara village on Purulia-Raghunathpur State Highway. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAnother woman Pranati Mahata, who was accompanying the victim, also received injuries in the accident.Eyewitnesses told police that the Raghunathpur-bound pickup van was running at a high speed when the driver lost control over the vehicle and it knocked down the victim.Bisakha Mahata died on the spot as she received critical injuries on various parts of her body. The accused driver fled the spot along with the vehicle. Locals rushed the injured victim to a local hospital. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedAfter being informed police reached the spot and recovered the body of the deceased. A heated altercation broke out between the police and the villagers, some of whom ransacked a police jeep.The incident caused traffic jam in the area for nearly an hour. A huge contingent of police later rushed to the spot to bring the situation under control.Senior police officers assured the villagers that the accused driver would soon be arrested and action would be taken against vehicles flouting traffic norms.last_img read more

Class X student died of suffocation

first_imgKolkata: The preliminary postmortem report of the Class X girl who was found dead in her school washroom on Friday has indicated that she died due to suffocation caused by the polythene bag that was wrapped around her face, cutting off the supply of oxygen. The multiple slash injuries on her wrists were self-inflicted but did not lead to her death. Sleuths investigating the death of Krittika Pal has found similarity of her pattern of suicide to a web series that she would watch on her cell phone. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe suicide note that was recovered from the washroom beside her body clearly indicated that there was some sort of anger and depression within her. However, the sleuths are still in the dark about it. “She has written of somebody trying to inflict injury upon her in the suicide note. She may be suffering from some sort of hallucination or may be there was really somebody whose behaviour had been traumatising her. We need to speak to her parents for further leads but they are yet to recover from the shock,” an investigating officer said. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateChairperson of West Bengal State Commission for Protection of Child Rights Ananya Chatterjee Chakraborti who visited the school in Ranikuthi on Saturday said the school has informed her that the victim’s mother had told the school authorities after her daughter’s death that she had earlier made suicide attempts. “The school would have been extra cautious if they were informed of this suicidal tendency of the child earlier,” she added.last_img read more

Man airlifted to hospital after accident on Staffordshire road saw car overturn

first_imgDad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Punter found hiding in bushes Police search for missing woman Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailTwo people have been taken to hospital after a car overturned in an accident on a Staffordshire road this afternoon (Tuesday April 2). The B5030 was closed in both directions and there is very slow traffic due to an overturned vehicle between Old Uttoxeter Road and Hook Lane in Crakemarsh, near Uttoxeter.  Police, paramedics and firefighters are on scene of the crash, which involved two vehicles, and the collision is affecting traffic between Spath and Rocester according to traffic data company Inrix. One man was airlifted to hospital while a woman, who was in the same vehicle, was taken by land ambulance after both were freed by the fire service. Read MorePub to be demolished to make way for new homes   A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokeswoman said emergency services were called at around 2.25pm today. She added:  “Crews arrived to find a car which had overturned, with two occupants inside, following a collision with a second vehicle. Ambulance staff worked as a team to administer advanced trauma care to the man and woman, whilst working closely with fire service colleagues to extricate them from the vehicle. “The man was airlifted to Royal Stoke University Hospital whilst the woman was taken by land ambulance on blue lights to the same hospital for further emergency treatment.” Want to tell us about something going on where you live?  Let us know – Tweet us    @SOTLive    or message us on    our Facebook page. And if you have pictures to share, tag us on Instagram at StokeonTrentLive. Driver named following fatal collision Location of the collision (Image: Inrix) Police confirmed the road had reopened by around 6.15pm. A spokesman  said:  “Road now reopened. Thank you for your patience whilst officers conducted enquiries at the scene.” A Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service spokeswoman said:  “Uttoxeter and Longton crews are at an incident involving an overturned vehicle in Crakemarsh. “Two casualties were trapped and the firefighters have quickly released one woman and are now working to free a male casualty. Ambulance are also in attendance.” A short time later they added:  “Both casualties have now been released from the vehicles and are in the care of the paramedics. Crews are now ensuring the area is safe and will be leaving the scene shortly.” In a separate incident this afternoon, a motorcyclist has been taken to hospital after a collision on the A521 near Forsbrook. Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLivelast_img read more

Now open Club Med Les Arcs Panorama in the French Alps

first_imgTags: Club Med, Openings & Renovations Share Tuesday, December 18, 2018 THE FRENCH ALPS — Over 900 guests from 29 countries helped celebrate the grand opening of Club Med’s newest mountain resort, Les Arcs Panorama, in the French Alps last Friday.After 18 months of construction, the 4-Trident, 433-room premium resort debuted on Dec. 14 at an altitude of 1,750 metres, featuring panoramic views of the Tarentaise valley and surrounding peaks. It is now considered one of the largest mountain resorts in the world.Henri Giscard d’Estaing, President of Club Med, told esteemed guests that Les Arcs Panorama reflects what Club Med does best.“With elected members and partners from the Alps, worldwide partners, shareholders and journalists by our side, I am especially proud to celebrate the opening of this impressive new flagship,” he said. “This new location is a testament to our commitment to mountain destinations and our desire to play a leading role in the development of the Alpine tourist heritage.”The resort will be a year-round destination, open in both winter and summer, and is located 20 minutes from the Bourg-Saint-Maurice train station, and 2.5 hours from the Lyon and Geneva international airports. Highlights include a range of childcare facilities for infants and children between four months and 17 years, a vast selection of sports, well-being experiences, and direct access to the region’s 425 kilometres of ski slopes.More news:  Beep, beep! Transat hits the streets with Cubamania truckLes Arcs Panorama will be followed by the December 2019 opening of the new Alpe d’Huez Club Med resort, which will be upgraded from 3-Trident to 4-Trident after a complete renovation and extension. Then, in December 2020, the company will open its first mountain resort in Canada, Club Med Québec Charlevoix, Club Med’s first location in North America open all year round. Posted bycenter_img Now open: Club Med Les Arcs Panorama in the French Alps Travelweek Group << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more