Jasmine Dooney & Bourke Bags Available in Parks and Online

first_imgFoldover crossbody, $178.00Satchel, $228.00The large tote is priced at $298.00. But remember that you may qualify for discounts if you’re an annual passholder, DVC member, or use a Disney Visa card. Always ask at the register. What do you think of these new bags? Will you add one to your Dooney & Bourke collection? Or are they not your cup of tea? Let us know in the comments. Photos: Christina Harrison Share This!There’s a new collection of Jasmine themed Dooney & Bourke bags available in the Disney Parks and on shopDisney.com. We found ours at Uptown Jewelers on Main Street in the Magic Kingdom, but they will be available in many locations. last_img read more

Big Data: Businesses Still Uncertain how to Use the Technology

first_imgBusinesses say they just don’t know how to apply and what to expect from Big Data technology.  A survey from SnapLogic and TechValidate that focused on how businesses are using Big Data and Hadoop technologies found that 52 percent said that the technology is too new to really know how to best implement and use it.  78 percent said that they weren’t sure when they would implement the technology.  Despite the uncertainty though, topping the budget for this year for many organizations will be purchases of technology for big data analytics.Here are two of the results from the survey.What are the goals of today’s Big Data Projects?Customer analytics (52 percent)Operational analytics (40 percent)Internet of Things and Data-Driven products (38 percent)What are the barriers to achieving Big Data ROI?Lack of technical skills (42 percent)Compliance and Security (41 percent)Data Fragmentation (34 percent)last_img read more

Search Engine DuckDuckGo Partners With Web of Trust to Help Users Avoid Scam Websites

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting audrey watters Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Earlier this week, we reported that Google had tweaked its search algorithm following a story in The New York Times about unscrupulous merchants gaming Google’s search rankings via negative merchant reviews. The solution implemented by DuckDuckGo goes beyond just “algorithmic search” to generate results, something that works particularly well when you’re shopping or downloading. Tags:#search#web Alternative search engine DuckDuckGo has announced a partnership with Web of Trust (WOT) to help improve the quality of its search results. DuckDuckGo already goes the extra mile to remove spam from search results, to crowd-source info, and to protect users’ privacy, and as founder Gabriel Weinberg notes in announcing the partnership, working with WOT “further extends all three of these focuses.”Web of Trust (WOT) is a community-based safe surfing tool that uses a traffic-light rating system to help users stay safe as they search and shop online. The ratings are powered by a worldwide community of over 16 million users who, based on their experiences, rate the reputation of some 30 million websites in terms of trustworthiness, privacy, and vendor reliability. With this partnership, DuckDuckGo has added a new setting option that allows you replace the favicons that appear next to site results with WOT’s traffic-light ratings. In other words, green is go; red, no go.last_img read more

Imported wolves settle in as Lake Superior island teems with moose

first_img Thirteen new radio-collared wolves are now scouting Isle Royale in Michigan and feasting on moose, whose numbers this winter reached 2060—the second highest estimate since ecologists began to study predators and prey on the island in 1958. The new wolves, imported to help restore the U.S. national park from overbrowsing by moose, are largely avoiding the territory of the remaining two wolves of the original population.Twenty female moose are also sporting radio collars, allowing biologists to watch both wolf and moose movements online. After 8 years essentially unfettered by predation because wolf numbers were so low, the moose population has been booming at 19% a year, according to data released today by Michigan Technological University (MTU) in Houghton.The new wolves are expected to check moose numbers and help restore balsam fir and other plants, according to National Park Service (NPS) planners. And the flood of GPS data is revealing “stuff we’ve never seen before,” says MTU wildlife ecologist Rolf Peterson, such as where moose congregate to feed on new spring growth. Peterson and his colleagues plan to chemically analyze the specific balsam fir trees moose eat to determine whether they choose twigs with compounds that may have anti-inflammatory properties.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) National Parks of Lake Superior Foundation Imported wolves settle in as Lake Superior island teems with moose A male wolf from Michipicoten, Canada, heads into its new home on Isle Royale in Michigan last month.center_img By Christine MlotApr. 30, 2019 , 8:00 AM Meanwhile, the collared wolves are transmitting numerous locations where they cluster, presumed to be moose kills, which will help researchers collect moose bones. These new data “will totally redirect our attention,” Peterson says.Moose in the Great Lakes region are at the southernmost edge of their range, and they are declining as the climate changes—except on Isle Royale, notes Adrian Wydeven, a wildlife biologist retired from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in Cable. The new data may help scientists understand what’s behind that difference, he says. He sees the project “as more of a moose conservation effort rather than wolf conservation.”The NPS wolf relocation had a rough start, including a partial U.S. government shutdown in January, bad weather, and depleted funding. Two wolves died, one before transport, one after several weeks on the island; one imported female traveled back home when an ice bridge to the mainland formed in January.Eight wolves hail from Michipicoten Island Provincial Park in Canada across Lake Superior. (The others are from Minnesota and mainland Ontario in Canada.) Wolves on the smaller Ontario island had eliminated their chief prey, caribou, and had been subsisting mainly on beaver. These wolves appeared underfed, but they were relocated as a pack, boosting their chances of thriving on Isle Royale, Peterson says.Meanwhile, the island-born, highly inbred pair of the original population “is not giving up on each other,” says Peterson, who observed them from a spotter plane in February. As in previous mating seasons, the now 8-year-old female rebuffed the interest of the 10-year-old male, her father and half-sibling. They kept busy scent marking their territory in response to the relocated wolves as well as to tracks of other mainland wolves that apparently found their way across the ice bridge and back.The pair’s pedigree demonstrates the challenge of maintaining genetic diversity on Guam-size Isle Royale. “Inbreeding is basically inevitable due to the island’s small size,” says University of California, San Francisco, geneticist Jacqueline Robinson, who analyzed the genomes of 11 Isle Royale wolves from blood samples collected since 1988. To further diversify the population, NPS plans to import more wolves from Michigan this fall.last_img read more

15 days agoAlisson the world’s best says Liverpool coach Achterberg

first_imgAlisson the world’s best says Liverpool coach Achterbergby Ansser Sadiq15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool coach John Achterberg believes that keeper Alisson Becker is the best in the world.The Brazilian is the club’s no.1 shot stopper and contributed significantly to their Champions League win last season.He pulled off several big game saves to ensure the Reds were shutting out the opposition. And Achterberg believes he is the best in the world in his position.”It is tough for me to say as a goalkeeper coach but it’s definitely how I see it [he is the best],” says Achterberg to the Liverpool Echo.”I think he has been the most consistent if you look at all the goalkeepers around, that is the truth. “Now we try to maintain it and keep it like this for the next five or six years. He has set his targets and we try to push it that way, that is the plan.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

NFL Coaches Yell At Refs Because It Freakin Works

In the first quarter of a scoreless 2016 AFC Championship game against the New England Patriots, Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos faced third-and-6 from their own 44-yard line. Wide receiver Demaryius Thomas ran a 15-yard out, breaking toward the Broncos’ sideline. He did not catch Manning’s wobbly throw, but there was contact on the play, and Denver’s players and coaching staff appealed to the official for a pass interference call on Patriots cornerback Logan Ryan. They got one, and the Broncos got a first down, scoring the game’s opening touchdown four plays later.On the ensuing drive, the Patriots faced third-and-3 at their own 27-yard line. Rob Gronkowski ran a wheel route up the Broncos’ sideline with T.J. Ward in coverage. As the Patriots tight end turned to look back for the ball, the defender made contact and shoved him, preventing a catch. Both Gronk and Tom Brady yelled for a penalty. The flag did not come, and the Patriots were forced to punt.Similar plays led to different outcomes that benefited the team on the sideline closest to the on-field action. Most NFL refs would likely say they are immune any sideline bias. “If I make a call because a coach is screaming at me on one side of the field and it’s wrong, that’s a bad day for me,” former NFL official Scott Green told us. (The NFL declined to comment.)But as it turns out, a sideline bias in the NFL is real, and it’s spectacular. To prove it, we looked at the rates at which refs call the NFL’s most severe penalties, including defensive pass interference, aggressive infractions like personal fouls and unnecessary roughness, and offensive holding calls, based on where the offensive team ran its play.1Some of this research was published in March in Economic Inquiry.For three common penalties, the direction of the play — that is, whether it’s run toward the offensive or defensive team’s sideline — makes a significant difference. In other words, refs make more defensive pass interference calls on the offensive team’s sideline but more offensive holding calls on the defensive team’s sideline. What’s more, these differences aren’t uniform across the field — the effect only shows up on plays run, roughly, between the 32-yard lines, the same space where coaches and players are allowed to stand during play.The following graphs show the penalty rates per 1,000 plays for defensive pass interference and aggressive defensive penalties, which include unnecessary roughness, personal fouls, unsportsmanlike conduct, and horse-collar tackles.2The data includes regular-season games between 2010 and 2014, and uses coin-toss information provided by Football Outsiders and play-by-play data from Armchair Analysis. To estimate penalty rates, we used a model of penalty outcomes that depends on yard line and which sideline (offensive or defensive team’s) the play was closer to. Additional methodological details can be found here. So what could be causing this phenomenon?Refs are faced with a near-impossible task. They make judgment calls in real time, relying on just their eyes and their experience. Deprived of the advantages, like instant replay, that we enjoy from the couch, refs have less information to help them resist the normal subconscious urge to draw on external cues for assistance in making borderline calls. In psychology terms, this process is called cue learning. It’s why we laugh longer in the presence of other humans laughing,4Which, in turn, is the reason that many TV comedies use a laugh track. why we eat more in the presence of overweight company, and why our judgment of persuasive speeches is influenced by the audience’s reaction.The most common cue in sports is crowd noise, and because crowd noise almost always supports the home team, the way the fans sway the referees is the No. 1 driver of home-field advantage in sports. And one notable experiment suggests that how loud a crowd is helps refs decide whether an interaction should be penalized. A pair of German researchers showed actual referees old video clips of possible soccer infractions, with crowd noise played at high or low volume. Refs looking at the exact same interactions were more likely to hand out a yellow card when they heard a lot of crowd noise than when the volume was low.It follows, then, that screaming and hat-throwing football personnel may also have an effect on referee choices. In football, this sideline bias even seems to supersede refs’ tendency to support the home team: The differences in the penalty rates from sideline to sideline are several times larger than the differences in penalty rates between the home and away teams.That bias can affect the outcome even when officials have time to confer. In a 2015 playoff game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Detroit Lions, Matthew Stafford threw a third-and-1 pass to Brandon Pettigrew. Officials initially called defensive pass interference on the Cowboys’ Anthony Hitchens.But the flag occurred right in front of the Cowboys sideline. This led to some confusion. It also led to a helmetless Dez Bryant yelling at the official.After conferring with each other, the officials picked up the flag, a decision that Mike Pereira, Fox Sports’ rules analyst and the NFL’s former vice president of officiating, said was incorrect. Brian Burke of Advanced Football Analytics calculates that when the official picked up the flag, the Lions’ chances of winning that game dropped by 12 percentage points.Dallas won 24-20.Check out our latest NFL playoff predictions. Refs throw flags for defensive infractions at significantly higher rates when plays are run in the direction of the offensive team’s sideline; near midfield, defensive penalties are called about 50 percent more often on the offensive team’s sideline than the defensive team’s. Close to the end zone, where the sidelines are supposed to be free of coaches and players, these differences are negligible.For offensive flags, that association is reversed, at least on holding penalties.3Offensive pass interference calls didn’t vary by proximity to either team’s sideline. Here’s the rate of holding calls made on outside run plays, which shows how the defensive team’s sideline can help draw flags on the offense. Around midfield, offensive holding gets called about 35 percent more often on plays run at the defensive team’s sideline. read more

30 NFL teams survey Buckeye prospects at Pro Day

Ohio State football players showed their talents for 30 different NFL teams at the Buckeyes’ Pro Day in the Woody Hayes Athletic Center Friday. Thirteen players, including running back Daniel “Boom” Herron, wide receiver DeVier Posey, offensive tackles Mike Adams and J.B. Shugarts, linebacker Andrew Sweat and center Mike Brewster, attended the workout. Scouts from every NFL team except the Chicago Bears and New York Jets came to take in the action and evaluate the NFL hopefuls. Herron compared the day to a job interview. “(There were) a lot of great coaches out here,” Herron said. “You just want to put on the best show, be at your best.” The Buckeyes’ Pro Day, which was led by OSU football strength and conditioning coach Mickey Marotti, schedule featured events such as the 40-yard dash, 20-yard shuttle, three cone drill, broad jump and individual position drills. The 40-yard dash, which is considered by many as one of the most important measurable heading into the NFL Draft in April, saw only 10 Buckeyes and three non-OSU participants participate in the drill as Posey, Adams and Brewster opted to not test their 40-times. Posey said the day’s events were the best part of the drafting process. “This is the best part, man. Just football,” Posey said. “Running routes, catching balls, I feel like I do that the best. I just wanted to come out and make sure I catch everything today.” Shugarts said he met with several teams, including the Kansas City Chiefs. “I was doing a lot of board work with the Chiefs,” Shugarts said. “I just got done with that … Just going over pass protections, they asked us our favorite run plays.” While the purpose of the day was for Buckeye football players to prove to NFL scouts they have the ability to play at the next level, players’ family, friends and a number of former OSU players showed up to watch the action for themselves. Notably, former Buckeye football players Beanie Wells, Jim Cordle, Doug Worthington, Bobby Carpenter, Joey Galloway, LeCharles Bentley, Chris Spielman, Andy Katzenmoyer and Dick LeBeau attended. Additionally, current OSU football players such as Braxton Miller, Etienne Sabino, Travis Howard and Bradley Roby also came to support their former teammates. Other players who took part in the day’s trials were Dionte Allen, Nate Ebner, Donnie Evege, Aaron Gant and Grant Schwartz. In some ways, Friday’s combine was one of the last chances for OSU players to improve their NFL Draft status in the eyes of teams around the league. Officially, the draft opens on April 26. Andrew Hollern contributed to this story. read more

How the Ohio State baseball team passes the time during rain delays

Rain delays are a big part of baseball, and the Ohio State baseball team was reminded of that this past weekend. During rain-outs, the players have to keep themselves entertained, and the Buckeyes have a few preferred pastimes they use while waiting to participate in America’s pastime. A game can be delayed when rain causes low visibility for players, the field isn’t playable due to pooling or standing water or if there is lightning in the area, according to the Major League Baseball rule book. The umpires at the games make rulings about rain delays. Delayed games might be resumed when the weather improves to the umpires’ liking, or the field is cleared of water, but are canceled and can be made up in a doubleheader if the problem persists. The OSU baseball team had two games postponed due to rain. The most recent weather-related interruption in the Buckeyes’ schedule occurred Saturday when OSU’s afternoon game against Nebraksa was rained out and rescheduled for Sunday as part of a doubleheader. OSU lost both games, 5-4, and 17-9, respectively, and lost the series, 2-1. The Buckeyes also had seven games rained-out and cancelled last season. Buckeye players said no one has done anything comparable to the viral videos of minor-leaguers jousting or holding a dance competition, but they like to have fun during weather delays. “We haven’t had any jousting, but we had our manager slide across the turf when it was raining,” said senior outfielder Dave Corna. “But for the most part, we’re just fooling around and staying loose.” Senior pitcher Andrew Armstrong said the Buckeyes haven’t had a chance to bust out anything too crazy since there’s only been one rain delay. Armstrong also said as a team, they like to stay relaxed during delays before and during games. “It all really depends on what you feel like doing,” Armstrong said. “Some guys like to have fun and do stuff. We’ll go and play two-ball, a practice game or we’ll watch TV. It depends on the mood of the game. Like, if we’re losing probably not a lot, but if it’s before the game we’ll just have fun.” Players said they like to stay relaxed during the delays in the middle of games, but coach Greg Beals said the players tend to keep working as well. “You try to keep it loose,” Beals said. “Some guys will go in (to the team clubhouse) and play cards or play XBOX, and some guys will even hit in the batting cages. Other guys will just sit in the dugout and play the name game. A bunch of different stuff goes on.” Beals said his team is full of guys with lots of personality, but the fun will stay in-house when the tarp is rolled out onto the field because of rain. “We’ve got some good characters in our club, but we’re not the type to go out on stage and do it,” Beals said. “We’ll keep it in the clubhouse.” read more

Gentrification Good for Some Black Owned Businesses

first_imgOwners at Lee’s Flower Shop say business has grown tremendously in recent years.WASHINGTON — It is a busy time for Lee’s Flower and Card Shop, just days before Valentine’s Day, when Americans spend $1.9 billion on flowers and 64 percent of men and 36 percent of women give flowes to a significant other. The staff in the shop, located on U Street and 11th Avenue in northwest Washington, is swamped as workers rush tor fill orders for weddings, Valentine’s Day, and other events.Two blocks away on the corner of U Street and Georgia Avenue, workers at Johnnie’s Florist, another black-owned floral shop in the Shaw neighborhood, are just as hurried.  Business is good. This year, business is better than it has been in a long time as the flood of new residents into the neighborhood, most of them White, have the cash registers at both establishments ringing like never before.“In the past five years, we have seen business grow tremendously,” said Stacy Lee Banks, a third generation owner of the store her grandparents started in 1945.  “People want fresh flowers for their home, for dinner parties, for dates.“Because the people of the neighborhood are changing, you have those with eclectic interests. There are more and more people into plants, herbs, and flowers. They have a passion for these things.  So they don’t mind spending.”Johnnie Harris echoed those sentiments. “We have clients all over the D.C. metro area,” Harris said, “but the new boom in the neighborhood has definitely been a plus.”In the past five years, U Street and Georgia Avenue have undergone tremendous change as new residents, most of them White, have moved in. Expensive condominiums, renovated homes and businesses, trendy bars, restaurants, and lounges have changed the landscape and demographics of the area.   Some long-time residents sold their homes at a profit and moved to the suburbs or to retirement communities.  Others, however, were forced out by climbing rents or newly constructed high-end housing.While gentrification has been bad for some, causing businesses to shrink and close, it has been good for Lee’s and Johnnie’s.  “Gentrification has had no effect on my business in a negative way,” said Harris, who has been in business for 20 years. “We have profited for there being changes around the area.”Lee’s has seen profits double in the past five years, said Lee-Banks, a business graduate of nearby Howard University who began working in the store at age 12.  “Business is booming,” she said.  “At one point, the majority of our customers were half and half, and now it’s mostly White. There is nothing wrong with it.  We accommodate our customers and business is better than ever before.”Though profits are soaring and business is doing well, Lee Banks said she does have some regrets. “Although I love the new business and customers we receive, it has been bittersweet,” she said, “sweet for us and the business, but bitter for the people of the community who have lost their homes.”last_img read more

MacFarland Middle School Like DC is Changing

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comOne of the District of Columbia’s middle schools is a powerful example of the demographic changes taking place in much of the city.Henry Brown Floyd MacFarland Middle School, with grades 6-8, is located in the gentrifying Petworth neighborhood on the southern end of Ward 4. The school had a predominant Latino enrollment during the 2017-2018 academic year, with 87 percent and Black students made up only 13 percent.MacFarland Middle School is unique in D.C. because it is currently majority Latino and used to be predominantly Black. (Courtesy Photo)However, the principal, Mark Sanders, told the AFRO that MacFarland’s make-up is subject to change due to the $63 million modernization highlighted by its ribbon cutting Aug. 20. “Last year, we were working with a smaller building,” Sanders said. “Now we will be able to accommodate more students to come to MacFarland.”Sanders couldn’t quote exact racial statistics because students were still being enrolled. Nevertheless, he said that Black students were welcomed at the school despite its growing Latino population due to its successful dual Spanish language program where English and Spanish is taught in various subjects.Sanders said there are some Black students in the dual language enrollment program.MacFarland is noteworthy because it was founded in 1925 as a Whites-only school. It remained White majority until the late 1960s when African Americans began to move into Petworth and surrounding neighborhoods and by 1980 it was a predominantly Black school with a sprinkling of Latinos.In 1990, U.S. census data reveals that Petworth was 88 percent Black and six percent White and Latino. In 2010, though, Petworth’s Black population had dropped to 57 percent while it’s White and Latino population increased 15 and 26 percent, respectively. MacFarland is next to Theodore Roosevelt Senior High School, which is 54 percent Black, 46 percent Latino and one percent White.At the ribbon cutting, D.C. Councilmember Brandon Todd (D-Ward 4) beamed as he toured the building with his staff, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser (D), community leaders and students. Todd told the AFRO he was aware of MacFarland’s changing demographics over the decades and isn’t worried about it. “I am very pleased that Ward 4 has the largest number of Latino residents in the city,” Todd said. “This underscores that Ward 4 is for everyone and this school is for Blacks, Whites, Hispanics and Asians. What we would like to happen is when students finish MacFarland; they will go to Roosevelt where they will continue to get a quality education.”Sanders noted during his remarks at the ribbon cutting that MacFarland is the only bi-lingual middle school in the city and that has some worried that Black students’ academic needs will be ignored. However, Mary Diatta, a Senegal native who has a son enrolled at MacFarland, told the AFRO she isn’t concerned.“I have no problem with the school,” Diatta said. “To me, I think it is important that everything is equal. The children, regardless of whether they are Black or Latino, should learn the same thing.”Sanders said students, regardless of race, will be educated by the District’s school system curriculum. “All of our sixth graders will take science and there are no academic tracks,” he said. “All students will adhere to the rigorous standards and they will take math and English language arts together.”last_img read more