Study shows crayfish exhibit anxietylike behavior when stressed

first_img Play Spontaneous behavior of unstressed crayfish in the aquatic dark/light plus-shaped maze. Credit: Pascal Fossat. In another part of the experiment, the researchers examined the stressed crayfish and found they had elevated levels of serotonin, the same neurotransmitter that has been found to be elevated in stressed humans. The team found that they could cause the same types of protective behavior in the crayfish just by injecting them with serotonin. They also found that they could calm the crayfish by injecting them with chlordiazepoxide, a drug used to treat anxiety in humans—afterwards the stressed subjects ventured into the well-lit parts of the tanks in much the same ways as the unstressed crayfish. Explore further © 2014 Phys.org PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen More information: Science 13 June 2014: Vol. 344 no. 6189 pp. 1293-1297 DOI: 10.1126/science.1248811 A new tiny species of crayfish from the swamps of coastal eastern Australia Citation: Study shows crayfish exhibit anxiety-like behavior when stressed (2014, June 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-crayfish-anxiety-like-behavior-stressed.html PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreencenter_img (Phys.org) —A team of researchers working in France has found that when stressed, crayfish tend to exhibit anxiety-like behavior. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they conducted experiments involving crayfish behavior under stressful conditions and found that in addition to changes in behavior, the crustaceans also had elevated levels of a neurotransmitter also found in stressed humans. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Stress and anxiety are common problems in modern life as people try to fulfill expectations that arise from their jobs, family life and friends. Prior research has shown that stress is hard on people, both mentally and physically. For that reason, scientists have been searching for many years for ways to alleviate the stress that people feel—they’ve come up with many solutions, from advocating exercise to administering pharmaceuticals. None have been found to be the ultimate cure, however, so the search continues. In this new effort, the researchers in France studied anxiety behavior due to stress in crayfish to gain a new perspective on the condition and perhaps ways to treat it.To find out how crayfish respond to stress, the researchers subjected several of them to mild electric shocks then placed them into a specially designed tank of water—it was shaped like a cross, with two wings well lit, and two left in the dark. The researchers found that when the stressed crayfish were placed into the tank, they tended to avoid the well lit wings—a protective sort of behavior. Unstressed crayfish placed in the tank were tentative but did eventually explore the well-lit parts of the tank as they searched for food. Play This AAAS animation describes a primitive form of anxiety in crayfish, which is controlled by serotonin and treatable with anxiolytic drugs. Credit: Science/AAAS. The researchers note that their findings do not indicate that crayfish feel stress or anxiety in the same ways as we do, but instead suggest that the mechanism behind both is clearly similar, which hints at a shared evolutionary origin. A crayfish entering a light arm. Credit: Jean-Paul Delbecque. Journal information: Sciencelast_img read more

The Arizona Cardinals were just officially elimina

first_img The Arizona Cardinals were just officially eliminated from the playoffs with their loss to the New Orleans Saints on Sunday, as that defeat dropped them to 5-8-1 on the season.It’s a disappointing season and some might blame Cardinals quarterback Carson Palmer.Sports Illustrated’s Greg Bedard might be one who believes Palmer is less a victim and more of a cause for Arizona’s struggles. He thinks the Cardinals had enough weapons around Palmer that the team should have won more games. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File) Bedard placed the Cardinals ninth in his rankings of best NFL supporting casts — that, from judging pass protection, the run game, the weapons around the QB, coaching and the defense.Volume and the talent of David Johnson definitely make the running game look better than it is and the weapons as a whole haven’t held up their end of the bargain this season, but this is still a good situation. Bruce Arians has one of the more creative attacks but both the offensive line and an aging Carson Palmer have let Arians down, although he should have done more to help his QB.Bedard listed the Cardinals as having the fourth-best defense in the league and the fourth-best coaching staff. He ranked Arizona ninth in the weapons category.But Arizona has not done much in pass protection (24th) or in the run game (19th) despite Johnson’s numbers, according to the SI writer. Moreover, Palmer himself hasn’t kept pace with his level of play from a year ago.By ESPN’s QBR (21st) and by Sports Illustrated’s Most Valuable Quarterback rankings (26th), the Cardinals signal-caller has struggled.A year after being near the top in both categories, Palmer lands in the bottom and some of it has been his own fault.Palmer has thrown 22 touchdown passes and 3,694 yards through the air so far this season. He’s tied for seventh in the league with 13 interceptions. Top Stories Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Comments   Share   center_img Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Palmer has remained healthy for most of the season but was forced to miss only one game because of a concussion. However, Drew Stanton led the Cardinals into San Francisco and got the win in the game Palmer missed, so when the starter has played this year, Arizona is only 4-8-1. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more