The Big Problem With the Big 12’s New Transfer Policy Rule

first_imgThe recent Sam Ukwuachu Baylor rape case has been endlessly fascinating to me as I’m sure it has been to numerous people. There are so many angles to the story, the least important of which involved football.But where football and real life coincide could be in the Big 12’s attempt to prevent something similar to this from happening in the future.Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby told The Associated Press on Wednesday he “expects the new rule to be structured like the one implemented by the Southeastern Conference. The SEC prevents schools from accepting transfers who have been dismissed from another team for ‘serious misconduct,’ defined as sexual assault, domestic violence or other forms of sexual violence.”One problem with that.Ukwuachu wasn’t dismissed for serious misconduct. At least it doesn’t appear that way. Here’s what that ESPN article I just linked also notes:[Boise State] also said federal student privacy laws prohibit officials from releasing information about what led to Ukwuachu being dismissed from the team.So what good is the new policy?“Nothing is going to completely solve the problem because every instance is different,” Bowlsby said. “What our rule will do is mandate due diligence. If you go through the right processes you’re likely to come across the things that you want to discover before a decision is made.”“I think institutions will perform that due diligence and they’ll make their own decisions and I think that would include things like academic fraud. They’ll include problems that (an athlete) may have had in high school. Violence against women, certainly that was the initiative that put us in this position,” Bowlsby said. “I think it’s a broader net than that. I think it’s a responsibility to do the work so that you know who you are bringing to campus.”That looks very strong in print and sounds great. But the problem runs deeper. What about cases like Ukwuachu where players weren’t necessarily dismissed for domestic violence? What about … high school students?The one thing this does is sort of pile on to the new Ray Rice era that is more vocal (in a good way) about domestic violence and sexual assault. The Big 12 can’t implement every rule for every situation, but it can implement a broad, sweeping rule that sort of warns schools “don’t pull a Baylor.”That’s a good thing. I just hope it helps.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

BRYAN ADAMS SAYS ORIGINAL MASTERS OF BIG HITS LOST IN UNIVERSAL FIRE

first_imgMany of those musicians only learned recently of the damage through a report in The New York Times, after Universal downplayed the impact for years. Several acts, including Soundgarden and an estate representing Tupac Shakur, have sued, alleging that Universal failed to protect music ruined in the fire and inform them of the extent of its impact. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Universal suggested the Times “overstated” the losses, but the label’s CEO has said he owes the artists “transparency” and “answers” on the damage.Adams says he only learned of the impact when he started plotting a 30th anniversary reissue of his No. 1 album Reckless six years ago. Bryan Adams performs during the 2015 AFL Grand Final match between the Hawthorn Hawks and the West Coast Eagles at Melbourne Cricket Ground on October 3, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. Quinn Rooney / GETTY IMAGES He contacted the archival department of Universal Music Group, which stored the master tapes, artwork and videos for his album, which included the massive hits “Summer of ‘69” and “Heaven.” But he returned almost empty-handed when they couldn’t find copies.Adams explained by email he eventually located a “safety copy” of the Reckless master at his vault in the Warehouse Studio in Vancouver, which led to a remastered edition of Reckless in 2014.But he says he’s uncertain if master copies for his eight other studio albums at A&M, which was later acquired by Universal, still exist. Those projects would include Cuts Like a Knife and Waking Up the Neighbours.Sheryl Crow, meanwhile. says the original tapes of albums such as Tuesday Night Music Club and the track “All I Wanna Do” perished in a 2008 fire at Universal Music Group.Crow told the BBC Wednesday that her master tapes and back-ups were destroyed in the blaze and that she only discovered the loss after a New York Times report revealed the extent of the damage.Crow says the fire “feels a little apocalyptic” and that she didn’t “understand the coverup.”Universal did not immediately respond to a request for comment.By David Friend ~ The Canadian Press ~ With files from the Associated Presscenter_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter Bryan Adams says the original masters of many of his biggest hits were likely destroyed in a 2008 fire at Universal Studios Hollywood, a blaze for which the extent of the damage has only recently come to light.The Kingston, Ont.-born singer-songwriter is among hundreds of artists whose original master recordings, artwork and photography is believed to have perished in the massive fire that engulfed a part of the Hollywood backlot over a decade ago. The list includes a number of Canadian acts, including Joni Mitchell, Nelly Furtado and Rufus Wainwright. Advertisementlast_img read more

Commissioner says RCMP has no cases of alleged coerced sterilization but invites

first_imgRCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki told the House of Commons health committee Tuesday that her force is not aware of any cases, past or present, involving coerced sterilization. APTN file photo.APTN NewsThe RCMP is seeking the names of potential victims of coerced sterilization procedures and wants lawyers to help in the process, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki said Tuesday.In testimony before the House of Commons health committee, Lucki said the RCMP is willing to meet with victims, adding it would be helpful if lawyers could talk to complainants about coming forward.“The lawyers…if they were to speak with those victims and provide them the options of coming to the police, we would absolutely sit down with each and every victim that they had to look at it from a criminal point of view,” she said.“Obviously they are not going to release their names without their consent as well. But…if we were to have those conversations, and possibly we could convince victims to come forward through the lawyers, that would be one avenue that we could explore.”MPs asked Lucki to testify as part of a study about ongoing concerns from predominantly Indigenous women who allege they were coerced or forced into tubal ligation procedures during childbirth.Her testimony also followed a letter sent this spring by NDP health critic Don Davies who asked the RCMP to conduct an investigation of serious and credible allegations that have been brought forward.APTN Investigates has reported a number of alleged coerced sterilizations of Indigenous women.One woman who can’t be named because of a court imposed publication ban, told APTN that, when she gave birth to a baby girl at the Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon in 2010, she was pressured into consenting to permanent sterilization by a physician, a social worker, and hospital staff because she was a recovering addict.An incident of coerced sterilization of an Indigenous women is alleged to have taken place at the Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon, Sask. in 2010. APTN file photo.“They clearly heard me say I do not want to do this,” she said. “It was clear I didn’t want to do this. They kept harassing me and harassing me every time they came in my room.”After she went public with her story, other Indigenous women began to come forward with similar accounts.Another woman, who also can’t be named, told APTN told she was pressured into sterilization at the hospital while in full labour with her second child in 2008.“I didn’t have any family or friends with me,” she said. “One of the nurses had approached me and she said, “You know, clearly you don’t want to be in this kind of position again and there’s this option available of having your tubes tied.”She said staff told her there were no side effects and that the procedure could be reversed.Lucki told Davies in a March letter that the force would work with commanding officers in each province and territory as well as other police agencies to see if any complaints have been reported.“To date, we have no allegations that are on file for forced or coerced sterilization that were found to be reported to the RCMP directly,” Lucki said Tuesday, explaining the RCMP takes all criminal allegations very seriously and that the force has reached out to the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to raise awareness.In 2017, the Saskatchewan Health Region issued a public apology after complaints from Indigenous women, and a proposed class-action lawsuit was launched naming as defendants the Saskatoon Health Authority, the provincial and federal governments, and a handful of medical professionals.Dr. Judith Bartlett, a Métis physician who co-authored the external review, told the committee on Tuesday that Indigenous women interviewed for the report often felt invisible, profiled and powerless.She also said she does not believe women will come forward to the RCMP because there is “no safety there for them.”Those interviewed for the report were granted anonymity, she said, noting they often felt much better having been able to express the harm done to them.Much more research is needed to understand the scope of the problem because any time an individual is asked to make a decision when they’re not in the state of mind to weigh pros and cons constitutes coercion, Bartlett said.Dr. Jennifer Blake, chief executive of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, told MPs that obtaining consent for tubal ligations at the time of delivery should be avoided at all costs. She also noted that when she first learned of allegations a forced sterilizations, she thought it was in reference to a historical issue.Last Tuesday, lawyer Alisa Lombard, a partner with the firm Semaganis Worme Lombard, told the health committee she represents a client, referred to as D.D.S., was sterilized without proper and informed consent in December 2018 at a Moose Jaw, Sask., hospital.That same month, the United Nations Committee Against Torture urged Canada to act to address the issue of coerced sterilization, setting a one-year deadline to report back on progress.In response, Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor and Jane Philpott, then Indigenous services minister, sent a letter to provinces and territories proposing a working group of officials to discuss the concerns.Health Canada said Tuesday the group has had “productive discussions” about the scope and purpose of the federal-provincial-territorial plan to “advance cultural safety and humility in the health system.”As a first step, officials decided Health Canada would take the lead on “an environmental scan of cultural safety initiatives and practices across Canada,” the agency said in a statement.Lucki told the health committee the level of trust of the RCMP among Indigenous peoples “varies…depending on the community,” and that RCMP is working at developing empathy in addition to compassion.“It falls in line not just with reconciliation,” she said. “But if…our organization can learn to walk a mile in somebody’s shoes I think we would have a better understanding of their circumstance. And they would be treated differently if we had that understanding.”The commissioner also noted that investigations of alleged coerced sterilization “would fall under the mandate of the police of jurisdiction,” which in areas with municipal or provincial forces may not be the RCMP.Earlier this month the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls released its final report, citing coerced sterilization as one of the forms of violence against Indigenous women contributing to the inquiry’s findings of genocide.Among its calls for justice, which its Chief Commissioner Marion Buller referred to as “legal imperatives” for governments and other stakeholders, the inquiry called upon “all governments and health service providers to recognize that Indigenous Peoples…are the experts in caring for and healing themselves, and that health and wellness services are most effective when they are designed and delivered by the Indigenous Peoples they are supposed to serve.”The inquiry also called on institutions and health service providers “to ensure that all persons involved in the provision of health services to Indigenous Peoples receive ongoing training, education, and awareness in areas including, but not limited to: the history of colonialism in the oppression and genocide of Inuit, Métis, and First Nations Peoples.”With files from Cullen Crozier and The Canadian Press.news@aptn.calast_img read more

Milcon Spending Bill includes Missile Site BRAC Amendments

first_imgHouse lawmakers approved two amendments of interest to defense communities — one that would provide funding for an East Coast missile defense site and one that would prohibit a new BRAC round — as part of the fiscal 2016 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs spending bill the chamber approved Thursday.  Language allocating $30 million for the planning, design and construction of an East Coast missile defense site was offered by freshman Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y), whose district includes Fort Drum.Last year, the Defense Department said it would prepare environmental impact statements at four locations, including Fort Drum, N.Y., to determine a potential site to host ground-based interceptors to protect the East Coast. The department’s effort to identify an East Coast missile defense site follows Congress’ direction to study at least three potential sites, including at least two on the East Coast. DOD, however, has made no decision to proceed with construction of a new missile defense site, and officials do not believe it is necessary.The other three sites the department is studying are: Naval Air Station Portsmouth SERE Training Area, Maine; Camp Ravenna Joint Training Center, Ohio; and Fort Custer Training Center, Mich.Lawmakers also approved by voice vote an amendment that would prohibit the use of funds from the milcon spending bill to implement a new BRAC round. The provision was introduced by another Republican freshman, Rep. John Ratcliffe (Texas). Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Wilmington Police Assists Mother Who Gave Birth On Side Of Highway

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — At 9:56 this morning, Wilmington Public Safety Dispatch received a 911 call from a man who’s wife was in active labor and was about to give birth. He had pulled over on the side of I-93 at exit 39.Dispatcher Jill Regan provided instructions for the father as the baby was being born.As units were responding, Dispatcher Regan initially radioed that the baby’s head was showing. By the time Officer Matt Stavro arrived on scene, less than two minutes later, the baby had been fully delivered inside the vehicle.Officer Stavro provided first aid care for mother and baby until Wilmington Fire Department EMT’s and Action Ambulance paramedics arrived on scene.Mother and baby were transported to Winchester Hospital.(NOTE: The above press release is from the Wilmington Police Department.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Watch Highlights Of Wilmington Police Department’s National Night OutIn “Videos”VIDEO: Highlights From Wilmington Police Beach DayIn “Videos”Wilmington Police Make Drug Trafficking Arrest In Target Parking LotIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Facebook data leak Should you delete your account now

first_imgA 3D plastic representation of the Facebook logo is seen in this photo illustration May 13, 2015.ReutersFacebook’s deepening crisis over the data leak of 50 million people to British political-advertising firm Cambridge Analytica has led to a public outcry about its data policies.The hashtag #DeleteFacebook has been making the rounds on Twitter this week and when co-founder Mark Zuckerberg did come out to address the public, some 2 billion weren’t ready to forgive the social network giant.It is time. #deletefacebook— Brian Acton (@brianacton) March 20, 20181. Remove Facebook bookmark from your web browserIf you visit your Facebook page every 20 minutes, its time you get rid of the app from your web browser. The lesser you involve with Facebook, the better.2. Deactivate your Facebook accountIf you’re not able to control your constant urge to check Facebook, simply deactivate your account.Facebook will still have your data, of course, but you’ll get a chance to take a breather and depend less on the digital platform when you’re ready to jump back in.3. Stop signing in with FacebookDo not use your Facebook credentials to log into various sites and services. By doing this, you give other companies access to your Facebook data, which can be used for various illicit activities.Use a handy password manager to create and keep track of your logins and passwords instead. And if an app demands you sign into Facebook to use it, find an alternative.4. Delete your accountDeleting your account is also an option, if you want to completely distance yourself from the social media world.When you’re absolutely sure about closing your account, let Facebook know, and be prepared to stay away from your account. Change your mind, and you’ll have to start the countdown all over again.”It may take up to 90 days from the beginning of the deletion process to delete all of the things you’ve posted, like your photos, status updates or other data stored in backup systems. While we are deleting this information, it is inaccessible to other people using Facebook,” the company says in its Help Center page.last_img read more

BNP condemns attack on Bernicat

first_imgLogo of BNPAccusing the ruling party cadres of attacking the vehicle of US ambassador to Bangladesh Marcia Bernicat, BNP on Sunday demanded immediate action against those involved in the incident, news agency UNB reports.Speaking at a press conference at the party’s Nayapaltan central office, BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir also strongly condemned the incident saying that it is tantamount to attack the USA.”Bernicat is the representative of the USA. The attack on the US ambassador is tantamount to the attack on that country,” the news agency quoted Mirza Fakhrul Islam as saying.Fakrul also regretted that the attack will badly harm Bangladesh image in the international arena. “We demand the government immediately identify Awami League cadres who carried out the attack and met out exemplary punishment to them. We also strongly protest and denounce the attack,” he said.last_img read more

Nanosilicon rapidly splits water without light heat or electricity

first_img The researchers, Folarin Erogbogbo at the University of Buffalo and coauthors, have published their paper on using nanosilicon to generate hydrogen in a recent issue of Nano Letters.If hydrogen is ever to be used to deliver energy for wide commercial applications, one of the requirements is finding a fast, inexpensive way to produce hydrogen. One of the most common hydrogen production techniques is splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. There are several ways to split water, such as with an electric current (electrolysis), heat, sunlight, or a substance that chemically reacts with water. Such substances include aluminum, zinc, and silicon.As the scientists explained, silicon-water oxidation reactions have so far been slow and uncompetitive with other water splitting techniques. However, silicon does have some theoretical benefits, such as being abundant, being easy to transport, and having a high energy density. Further, upon oxidation with water, silicon can theoretically release two moles of hydrogen per mole of silicon, or 14% of its own mass in hydrogen.For these reasons, the scientists decided to take a closer look at silicon, specifically silicon nanoparticles, which have not previously been studied for hydrogen generation. Because silicon nanoparticles have a larger surface area than larger particles or bulk silicon, it would be expected that the nanoparticles can generate hydrogen more rapidly than the larger pieces of silicon. (Phys.org)—Although scientists know that when silicon mixes with water, hydrogen is produced through oxidation, no one expected how quickly silicon nanoparticles might perform this task. As a new study has revealed, 10-nm silicon nanoparticles can generate hydrogen 150 times faster than 100-nm silicon nanoparticles, and 1,000 times faster than bulk silicon. The discovery could pave the way toward rapid “just add water” hydrogen generation technologies for portable devices without the need for light, heat, or electricity. Journal information: Nano Letters But the improvements the scientists discovered with silicon nanoparticles far exceeded their expectations. The reaction of 10-nm silicon particles with water produced a total of 2.58 mol of hydrogen per mol of silicon (even exceeding theoretical expectations), taking 5 seconds to produce 1 mmol of hydrogen. In comparison, the reaction with 100-nm silicon particles produced a total of 1.25 mol of hydrogen per mole of silicon, taking 811 seconds to produce each mmol of hydrogen. For bulk silicon, total production was only 1.03 mol of hydrogen per mol of silicon, taking a full 12.5 hours to produce each mmol of hydrogen. For a rate comparison, the 10-nm silicon generated hydrogen 150 times faster than 100-nm silicon and 1,000 times faster than bulk silicon. “I believe the greatest significance of this work is the demonstration that silicon can react with water rapidly enough to be of practical use for on-demand hydrogen generation,” coauthor Mark Swihart, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Buffalo, told Phys.org. “This result was both unexpected and of potential practical importance. While I do not believe that oxidation of silicon nanoparticles will become a feasible method for large-scale hydrogen generation any time soon, this process could be quite interesting for small-scale portable applications where water is available.” Just add water: How scientists are using silicon to produce hydrogen on demand In addition to producing hydrogen faster than larger silicon pieces, the 10-nm silicon also produces hydrogen significantly faster than aluminum and zinc nanoparticles. As Swihart explained, the explanation for this inequality differs for the two materials. “Compared to aluminum, silicon reacts faster because aluminum forms a denser and more robust oxide (Al2O3) on its surface, which limits the reaction,” he said. “In the presence of a base like KOH [potassium hydroxide], silicon mostly produces soluble silicic acid (Si(OH)4). Compared to zinc, silicon is simply more reactive, especially at room temperature.”Although the larger surface area of the 10-nm silicon compared with larger silicon pieces contributes to its fast hydrogen production rate, surface area alone cannot account for the huge rate increase that the scientists observed. The surface area of 10-nm silicon is 204 m2/g, about 6 times greater than the surface area of 100-nm silicon, which is 32 m2/g. To understand what causes the much larger increase in the hydrogen production rate, the researchers conducted experiments during the silicon etching process. They found that, for the 10-nm particles, etching involves the removal of an equal number of lattice planes in each direction (isotropic etching). In contrast, for 100-nm particles and microparticles, unequal numbers of lattice planes are removed in each direction (anisotropic etching). The researchers attribute this etching difference to the different geometries of different-sized crystals. As a result of this difference, the larger particles adopt non-spherical shapes that expose less reactive surfaces compared to the smaller particles, which remain nearly spherical, exposing all crystal facets for reaction. Larger particles also develop thicker layers of oxidized silicon byproducts through which water must diffuse. Both of these factors limit the rate of the reaction on larger particles.To confirm that that the 10-nm silicon-water reaction generates hydrogen with no byproducts that could interfere with applications, the researchers used the silicon-generated hydrogen to operate a fuel cell. The fuel cell performed very well, producing more current and voltage than the theoretical amount of pure hydrogen, which is due to the fact that the 10-nm particles generated more hydrogen than the theoretical 14 wt %.The researchers hope that this surprising ability of silicon nanoparticles to rapidly split water and generate hydrogen could lead to the development of a hydrogen-on-demand technology that could enable fuel cells to be used in portable devices. This technology would require a large-scale, energy-efficient method of silicon nanoparticle production, but could have some advantages compared to other hydrogen generation techniques.”The key advantage of silicon oxidation for hydrogen generation is its simplicity,” Swihart said. “With this approach, hydrogen is produced rapidly, at room temperature, and without the need for any external energy source. The energy needed for hydrogen generation is effectively stored in the silicon. All of the energy input required for producing the silicon can be provided at a central location, and the silicon can then be used in portable applications.”The key disadvantage of silicon oxidation is its relative inefficiency. The energy input required to create the silicon nanoparticles is much greater than the energy available from the hydrogen that is finally produced. For large scale applications, this would be a problem. For portable applications, it is not. For example, the cost of electricity supplied by an ordinary household battery can easily be 10 to 100 times higher than the cost of electricity from a utility, but batteries still play an important role in our lives.”In the future, the researchers plan to further increase the hydrogen generation capacity of silicon oxidation by experimenting with different mixtures.”One direction that we are presently pursuing is the use of mixtures of silicon nanoparticles with metal hydrides, which also react with water to produce hydrogen,” Swihart said. “Compounds like lithium hydride and sodium hydride react with water to produce the base (LiOH or NaOH) that is needed to catalyze the silicon oxidation. However, they can react too fast with water (explosively) and are not stable in air. Mixing them with silicon nanoparticles or coating them with silicon nanoparticles may serve to both temper their reactivity and increase the hydrogen generation capacity of the system by replacing the added base (e.g., KOH in the published paper) with a material that also generates hydrogen.” A comparison of hydrogen generation rates for different forms of silicon. Maximum rates are in the left column with images of the samples on them. Average rates are in the right column. The red line indicates the maximum reported rate for hydrogen generated from aluminum. Credit: Folarin Erogbogbo, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Illustration of the multidisciplinary approach for producing hydrogen through silicon oxidation. The approach involves synthesizing silicon nanoparticles, the silicon-water reaction which generates hydrogen on demand, and using the hydrogen in a fuel cell for portable power. Credit: Folarin Erogbogbo, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society Explore further Copyright 2013 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys.org. Citation: Nanosilicon rapidly splits water without light, heat, or electricity (2013, January 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-01-nanosilicon-rapidly-electricity.html More information: Folarin Erogbogbo, et al. “On-Demand Hydrogen Generation using Nanosilicon: Splitting Water without Light, Heat, or Electricity.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/nl304680wlast_img read more

Class X student died of suffocation

first_imgKolkata: The preliminary postmortem report of the Class X girl who was found dead in her school washroom on Friday has indicated that she died due to suffocation caused by the polythene bag that was wrapped around her face, cutting off the supply of oxygen. The multiple slash injuries on her wrists were self-inflicted but did not lead to her death. Sleuths investigating the death of Krittika Pal has found similarity of her pattern of suicide to a web series that she would watch on her cell phone. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe suicide note that was recovered from the washroom beside her body clearly indicated that there was some sort of anger and depression within her. However, the sleuths are still in the dark about it. “She has written of somebody trying to inflict injury upon her in the suicide note. She may be suffering from some sort of hallucination or may be there was really somebody whose behaviour had been traumatising her. We need to speak to her parents for further leads but they are yet to recover from the shock,” an investigating officer said. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateChairperson of West Bengal State Commission for Protection of Child Rights Ananya Chatterjee Chakraborti who visited the school in Ranikuthi on Saturday said the school has informed her that the victim’s mother had told the school authorities after her daughter’s death that she had earlier made suicide attempts. “The school would have been extra cautious if they were informed of this suicidal tendency of the child earlier,” she added.last_img read more