Toronto FC wins MLS Supporters’ Shield

first_imgMLS Toronto FC wins MLS Supporters’ Shield Goal Last updated 2 years ago 09:13 1/10/2017 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(1) Jozy Altidore Justin Morrow Toronto FC MLS Kevin Sousa MLS Toronto Toronto v New York RB New York RB Videos The Canadian outfit claimed top spot in the regular season with a win over the New York Red Bulls Toronto FC has claimed the 2017 MLS Supporters’ Shield with a 4-2 win over the New York Red Bulls. Justin Morrow netted twice in the first half to put TFC 2-1 up at the break, but the Red Bulls, still fighting for their playoff lives, used a Daniel Royer penalty to pull level after 77 minutes. Supporters’ Shield ✅Congratulations @torontofc! #TFC https://t.co/Zx1sxdawXR— Major League Soccer (@MLS) October 1, 2017Just three minutes later the home side would go back in front with a penalty of its own.  Editors’ Picks Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. Aaron Long was called for a foul and TFC’s Víctor Vázquez made good from the spot with what proved to be the Shield-winning goal. Tucked away.Vazquez with the answer from the spot to put @torontofc back in front. #TORvNY https://t.co/49l1mEqkdj — Major League Soccer (@MLS) October 1, 2017 Morrow rounded out his hat trick with a goal deep into stoppage time to put the match on ice. TFC has been on top of the league standings since July 19, and this is the club’s first trophy of any kind in MLS history. Toronto locked up the best regular-season points total in MLS with two matches remaining, with the side at home against Montreal on Oct. 15 and away against Atlanta United on Oct. 22.last_img read more

Zanetti – Win but do more than that

first_imgInter’s vice-president Javier Zanetti speaks about his new book “Vincere, ma non solo”, and also delivered a message to the team ahead of their game against PSV.Zanetti released a new book titled “Vincere, ma non solo”, translating to “Win, but do more than that” in English. An apt message as Inter Milan prepare for a must-win Champions League tie against PSV on Tuesday.“My new book is different compared to my last one: it doesn’t concern my career as a footballer, but my adventure as a director,” Zanetti told the club’s website.“This is an important new stage in my life. Many people thought I would only be focusing on the sporting side of things, but for me, it’s vital to look at things from all aspects and to make my contribution to all the club’s projects.“The biggest challenge is sustainability. We are working with this in mind: we are taking part in many international projects with the aim of increasing the amount of money coming in. After a career as a footballer, this new challenge fascinates me a lot.“I am making my contribution so that the club can increase its revenue and the team can become more competitive. Inter has changed a lot.Romelu Lukaku, Serie A, Inter MilanCapello calls Lukaku “a modern striker” Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 The former Italian manager believes Romelu Lukaku is perfectly suited for Antonio Conte’s Internazionale Milan in the Serie A.“Ownership changes have taken place and I feel very comfortable in transmitting the values of the club as we look to continue along the path we’ve taken.”Inter Milan need to beat PSV in San Siro and hope Barcelona at least draw with Tottenham for them to qualify for the knockout stages.“Before we think about the result in the match between Barcelona and Tottenham, we need to do our job. We need to win our match, although it won’t be easy.“We will have to do our best to beat PSV Eindhoven, and then we can hope for a positive result at Camp Nou. Based on our performances, I think we deserve to make the Round of 16. Let’s hope we do,” Zanetti said.“We knew it would be a difficult group when the draw was made, but we also knew there was the possibility we could do well. We want to keep playing until the end, and we have to approach the match with confidence.”last_img read more

Small earthquake rattles rural San Diego county near Palomar Mountain

first_img Posted: September 16, 2018 Small earthquake rattles rural San Diego county near Palomar Mountain Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom SANTA YSABEL (KUSI) — A small earthquake struck a rural corner of San Diego County in the early morning hours Sunday.A preliminary magnitude 3.3 temblor was recorded near Palomar Mountain at 4:37 a.m. Sunday, according to the United States Geological Survey.The epicenter was located about 20 miles east-northeast of Escondido and about 16 miles north-northeast of Ramona — an area near Lake Henshaw.Reports on the USGS “Did You Feel It?” map showed light shaking could be felt throughout inland North County and the mountains of East County. September 16, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

Milcon Spending Bill includes Missile Site BRAC Amendments

first_imgHouse lawmakers approved two amendments of interest to defense communities — one that would provide funding for an East Coast missile defense site and one that would prohibit a new BRAC round — as part of the fiscal 2016 Military Construction-Veterans Affairs spending bill the chamber approved Thursday.  Language allocating $30 million for the planning, design and construction of an East Coast missile defense site was offered by freshman Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y), whose district includes Fort Drum.Last year, the Defense Department said it would prepare environmental impact statements at four locations, including Fort Drum, N.Y., to determine a potential site to host ground-based interceptors to protect the East Coast. The department’s effort to identify an East Coast missile defense site follows Congress’ direction to study at least three potential sites, including at least two on the East Coast. DOD, however, has made no decision to proceed with construction of a new missile defense site, and officials do not believe it is necessary.The other three sites the department is studying are: Naval Air Station Portsmouth SERE Training Area, Maine; Camp Ravenna Joint Training Center, Ohio; and Fort Custer Training Center, Mich.Lawmakers also approved by voice vote an amendment that would prohibit the use of funds from the milcon spending bill to implement a new BRAC round. The provision was introduced by another Republican freshman, Rep. John Ratcliffe (Texas). Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

What Are Town Boards Committees Talking About Week of April 29 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — According to the Wilmington Town Clerk’s calendar, below are the town and school board, committee and commission meeting scheduled for the week of Sunday, April 29, 2018.Sunday, April 29No MeetingsMonday, April 30NoneTuesday, May 1The Wilmington Board of Health meets at 5:30pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.The Wilmington Planning Board meet at 7:30pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.Wednesday, May 2The Wilmington Conservation Commission meets at 7pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.Thursday, May 3The Wilmington Recreation Commission meets at 5pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.The Wilmington Water & Sewer Commission will take a site visit to the Nassau Avenue Water Storage Tank at 5:30pm.Friday, May 4No MeetingsSaturday, May 5The Annual Town Meeting takes place at 10:30am in the High School Auditorium.All meetings are open to the public unless noted.(NOTE: While unlikely, it is possible additional meetings could be added to this week’s calendar on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday.  It’s best to check the Town Clerk’s calendar mid-week.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWhat Are Town Boards & Committees Talking About? (Week of September 1, 2019)In “Government”What Are Town Boards & Committees Talking About? (Week of August 4, 2019)In “Government”What Are Town Boards & Committees Talking About? (Week of July 14, 2019)In “Government”last_img read more

BNP condemns attack on Bernicat

first_imgLogo of BNPAccusing the ruling party cadres of attacking the vehicle of US ambassador to Bangladesh Marcia Bernicat, BNP on Sunday demanded immediate action against those involved in the incident, news agency UNB reports.Speaking at a press conference at the party’s Nayapaltan central office, BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir also strongly condemned the incident saying that it is tantamount to attack the USA.”Bernicat is the representative of the USA. The attack on the US ambassador is tantamount to the attack on that country,” the news agency quoted Mirza Fakhrul Islam as saying.Fakrul also regretted that the attack will badly harm Bangladesh image in the international arena. “We demand the government immediately identify Awami League cadres who carried out the attack and met out exemplary punishment to them. We also strongly protest and denounce the attack,” he said.last_img read more

UN wants to negotiate with US Canada to resettle Rohingyas

first_imgA Rohingya refugee child smiles at Leda Unregistered Refugee Camp in Teknaf. ReutersThe United Nations’ refugee agency has asked Bangladesh to allow it to negotiate with the United States, Canada and some European countries to resettle around 1,000 Rohingya Muslims living in the South Asian nation, a senior official at the agency said.Tens of thousands of Rohingya live in Bangladesh after fleeing Buddhist-majority Myanmar since the early 1990s, and their number has been swelled by an estimated 69,000 escaping an army crackdown in northern Rakhine State in recent months.The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) would push for resettlement of those most in need, despite growing resistance in some developed countries, particularly the United States under President Donald Trump, UNHCR’s Bangladesh representative, Shinji Kubo, told Reuters on Thursday.”UNHCR will continue to work with the authorities concerned, including in the United States,” Kubo said.”Regardless of the change in government or government policies, I think UNHCR has a clear responsibility to pursue a protection-oriented resettlement programme.”Kubo said 1,000 Rohingya refugees had been identified as priorities for resettlement on medical grounds or because they have been separated from their family members living abroad.”Resettlement will always be a challenging thing because only a small number of resettlement opportunities are being allocated by the international community at the moment,” Kubo said in an interview. “But it’s our job to try to consult with respective countries based on the protection and humanitarian needs of these individuals.”H.T. Imam, a political adviser to Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, said the resettlement proposal was “unrealistic” due to reluctance in the United States and Europe to take further Muslim refugees.Reuters reported this month that officials at an Australian immigration centre in Papua New Guinea were increasing pressure on asylum seekers to return to their home countries voluntarily, including offering large sums of money, amid fears a deal for the United States to take refugees had fallen through.Canada, Australia and the United States were the top providers of asylum to Rohingya Muslims who came to Bangladesh from Myanmar before Dhaka stopped the programme around 2012. A Bangladesh government official said it was feared the programme would encourage more people from Myanmar to use it as a transit country to seek asylum in the West.Canada has said it would welcome those fleeing persecution, terror and war, after Trump put a four-month hold on allowing refugees from seven Muslim-majority countries into the United States, an order since suspended by a U.S. district judge.HOPING FOR ACCESSA Rohingya refugee girl wipes her eyes as she cries at Leda Unregistered Refugee Camp in Teknaf. ReutersThe UNHCR supports around 34,000 refugees living in two government-registered camps in the Bangladesh coastal district of Cox’s Bazar, but a greater number of Rohingya live in makeshift settlements nearby, unregistered and officially ineligible to receive international aid.Kubo said he had asked Bangladesh to give the UN access to all the refugees who have recently arrived, adding that UNHCR and other international agencies were also willing to provide aid to poor Bangladeshis living near the refugee settlements to counter local resentment at the influx.Hasina adviser Imam said providing aid to the new refugees and its citizens was the responsibility of the government.Myanmar said late on Wednesday that a security operation that began after nine police officers were killed in attacks on border security posts on Oct. 9 had now ended.A report released by the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on Feb. 3 gave accounts of mass killings and gang rapes by troops during the operation, which it said probably constituted crimes against humanity.Two UN sources have separately told Reuters that more than 1,000 Rohingya may have been killed in the crackdown.Northern Rakhine has been locked down since October, and Myanmar has not said when aid groups or reporters might be allowed in.”We’re now hoping for immediate access to the affected areas in northern Rakhine as soon as possible with our resources, our protection expertise,” Kubo said. “That will also have a positive impact on what is happening in Bangladesh at the moment.”last_img read more

Priests as predators Long history of abuse in Indian churches

first_imgIn this photo taken on 4 November in 2018, Sister Josephine Villoonnickal, left, Sister Alphy Pallasseril, centre, and Sister Anupama Kelamangalathu, who have supported the accusation of rape against Bishop Franco Mulakkal, talk at St Francis Mission Home, in Kuravilangad in southern Indian state of Kerala. Photo: APThe stories spill out in the sitting rooms of Catholic convents, where portraits of Jesus keep watch and fans spin quietly overhead. They spill out in church meeting halls bathed in fluorescent lights, and over cups of cheap instant coffee in convent kitchens. Always, the stories come haltingly, quietly. Sometimes, the nuns speak at little more than a whisper.Across India, the nuns talk of priests who pushed into their bedrooms and of priests who pressured them to turn close friendships into sex. They talk about being groped and kissed, of hands pressed against them by men they were raised to believe were representatives of Jesus Christ.”He was drunk,” said one nun, beginning her story. “You don’t know how to say no,” said another.At its most grim, the nuns speak of repeated rapes, and of a Catholic hierarchy that did little to protect them.The Vatican has long been aware of nuns sexually abused by priests and bishops in Asia, Europe, South America and Africa, but it has done very little to stop it, The Associated Press reported last year.Now, the AP has investigated the situation in a single country — India — and uncovered a decades-long history of nuns enduring sexual abuse from within the church. Nuns described in detail the sexual pressure they endured from priests, and nearly two dozen other people — nuns, former nuns and priests, and others — said they had direct knowledge of such incidents.Still, the scale of the problem in India remains unclear, cloaked by a powerful culture of silence. Many nuns believe abuse is commonplace, insisting most sisters can at least tell of fending off a priest’s sexual advances. Some believe it is rare. Almost none, though, talk about it readily, and most speak only on the condition they not be identified.But this summer, one Indian nun forced the issue into the open.When repeated complaints to church officials brought no response, the 44-year-old nun filed a police complaint against the bishop who oversees her religious order, accusing him of raping her 13 times over two years. Soon after, a group of her fellow nuns launched a two-week public protest in India’s Catholic heartland, demanding the bishop’s arrest.It was an unprecedented action, dividing India’s Catholic community. Inside the accuser’s convent in rural Kerala state, she and the nuns who support her are now pariahs, isolated from the other sisters, many of whom insist the bishop is innocent. The protesting nuns get hate mail and avoid going out.”Some people are accusing us of working against the church, of being against the church. They say, ‘You are worshipping Satan,'” said one supporter, Sister Josephine Villoonnickal. “But we need to stand up for the truth.”Villoonnickal has been a nun for 23 years, joining when she was a teenager. She scoffs at the idea that she wants to harm the church.”We want to die as sisters,” she said.Some nuns’ accounts date back decades — like that of the sister, barely out of her teens, who was teaching in a Catholic school in the early 1990s.It was exhausting work, and she was looking forward to the chance to reflect on what had led her — happily — to convent life.”We have kind of a retreat before we renew our vows,” she said, sitting in the painfully neat sitting room of her big-city convent, where doilies cover most every surface, chairs are lined up in rows and the blare of horns drifts in through open windows. “We take one week off and we go for prayers and silence.”She had travelled to a New Delhi retreat centre, a collection of concrete buildings where she gathered with other young nuns. A priest was there to lead the sisters in reflection.The nun, who like others interviewed for this story spoke on condition she not be identified, is a strong and forceful woman who has spent years working with India’s poor and dispossessed, from battered wives to evicted families.But when she talks about the retreat her voice grows quiet, as if she’s afraid to be overheard in the empty room: “I felt this person, maybe he had some thoughts, some attraction.”He was in his 60s. She was four decades younger.One night, the priest went to a neighbourhood party. He came back late, after 9:30 pm, and knocked at her room.”‘I need to meet you,'” he said when she cracked open the door, insisting he wanted to discuss her spiritual life. She could smell the alcohol.”You’re not stable. I’m not ready to meet you,” she told him.But the priest forced open the door. He tried to kiss her. He grabbed at her body, groping wherever he could.Weeping, she pushed him back enough to slam the door and lock it.It wasn’t rape. She knows it could have been so much worse. But decades later she still reels at the memory, and this tough woman, for a few moments, looks like a scared young girl: “It was such a terrifying experience.”Afterward she quietly told her mother superior, who allowed her to avoid other meetings with the priest. She also wrote an anonymous letter to church officials, which she thinks may have led to the priest being re-assigned.But nothing was said aloud. There were no public reprimands, no warnings to the many nuns the priest would work with through his long career.She was too afraid to challenge him openly.”I couldn’t imagine taking that stand. It was too scary,” she said. “For me it was risking my own vocation.”So the fierce nun remained silent.Catholic history is filled with women who became martyrs to their own purity: Saint Agatha had her breasts torn off for refusing to marry; Saint Lucy was burned alive and stabbed in the throat for defending her virginity; Saint Maria Goretti was 11 years old when she was killed by a man who tried to rape her.”It is a sin!” Maria is said to have cried out. “God does not want it!”But for a nun, fighting off a priest’s advances means pinballing through centuries-old sexual and clerical traditions. Celibacy is a cornerstone of Catholic religious life, as is sexual purity among nuns. Many nuns say a sister who admits to a sexual experience — even if it’s forced — faces the risk of isolation within her order, and possibly even expulsion.”You’re not sure if you’ll be kept in your congregation, because so much is about your vow of chastity,” said Sister Shalini Mulackal, a New Delhi-based theologian. “That fear is there for the young ones to disclose what has happened to them.”At the same time, priests are seen as living representatives of Christ, with obedience to them another Catholic cornerstone.Then there is the isolation of young women struggling to find their way in new communities after leaving their homes.Caught at this intersection of sexual taboo, Catholic hierarchy and loneliness, sisters can be left at the mercy of predatory priests.”There’s a lot of emotion bottled up and when a little tenderness is shown by somebody it can be so easy for you to cross boundaries,” said Sister Dorothy Fernandes, who has spent years working with the urban poor in eastern India. “It can be hard to tell what is love and what is exploitation.”It’s particularly hard for sisters from Kerala, a deeply conservative region long the birthplace of most Indian nuns. Sex is rarely mentioned openly in small-town Kerala, boys and girls are largely kept apart, and a visible bra strap can be a minor crisis for a young woman.”Once you grow up, once you get your first menstruation, you are not encouraged to speak normally to a boy. And the boys also vice-versa,” said a nun from Kerala, a cheerful woman with sparkly glass earrings and an easy smile. She remembers the misery of Sunday mass as an adolescent, when boys would stand outside the church to watch girls filing in, eyes crawling over their young figures. “We have a terrible taboo about sex.”That naivety, she said, can be costly.Like the time she was a novice nun, still in her teens, and an older priest came to the Catholic centre where she worked. He was from Goa, a coastal region and former Portuguese colony.She shook her head: “I was in charge of visitors, and we had this bad habit of being hospitable.”At one point, she brought the priest’s laundry to his small room, where he was sitting. As she set down the clothes, he grabbed her and began to kiss her.At first, she had no idea what was happening.”The kissing was all coming here,” she said, gesturing at her chest.The confusion of that day is still clear on her face: “I was young. He was from Goa. I am from Kerala. In my mind I was trying to figure out: ‘Is this the way that Goans kiss?'”She quickly understood what was happening but couldn’t escape his fierce grip. She also could not call out for help: “I cannot shout! He’s a priest.””I didn’t want to offend him. I didn’t want to make him feel bad,” she said.So she pushed herself away from him until she could slip out the door.She quietly told a senior nun to not send novices to the priest’s room. But, like the nun who fought the drunken priest, she made no official complaint.A complaint against a priest means leveling an accusation against someone higher in the church hierarchy. It can mean getting pulled into a tangle of malicious rumors and church politics. It means risking your reputation, and the reputation of your order.In the church, even some of those who doubt there is widespread abuse of nuns say the silence can be enveloping.Archbishop Kuriakose Bharanikulangara, a New Delhi-based church leader, calls incidents of abuse “kind of sporadic. Once here, once there.”But “many people don’t want to talk,” he continued. “They may talk in the community, but they don’t want to bring it to the public, to the court.”Speaking up can also risk financial troubles, since many congregations of nuns are financially subservient to priests and bishops.The silence is magnified in India by demographics, religious politics and a deep-seated belief that women have little value.There are roughly 18 million Catholics in India, but that’s a small minority in this largely Hindu nation of 1.3 billion. Speaking up could tarnish the image of their church, many nuns worry, and feed criticism by Hindu hardliners.”Even we, as religious sisters, even we try to keep it quiet,” said Mulackal, the theologian. “A woman who goes through this experience, she just wants to hide it and pretend everything is OK.”The rapes, the nun says, happened in Room 20 of a small convent at the end of a one-lane road in rural Kerala.Set amid rows of banana and rubber trees near the little town of Kuravilangad, the sisters at the St Francis Mission Home spend their days in prayer or caring for the aged. In the garden, a statue of the Virgin Mary overlooks a decorative fish pond the size of a child’s wading pool. The pond is covered in green scum.The rapist, she says, was the most powerful man in this tiny small world: Bishop Franco Mulakkal.Smart and ambitious, Mulakkal had risen from small-town Kerala to become a bishop in north India, overseeing a sprawling Catholic community. He was also the official patron of her community of 81 sisters, the Missionaries of Jesus, wielding immense influence over its budgets and job assignments.The nun is a friendly woman with jet black hair known for her quiet confidence. Every few months, she says, Mulakkal would visit the St. Francis convent and summon her. Then, according to a letter she wrote to church officials, he raped her.The letter says the first rape happened on 5 May, 2014. The last time was on 23 September, 2016. The dates are recorded in the convent’s visitor logs.Mulakkal angrily denies the accusations, telling reporters the charges were “baseless and concocted” and accusing the sister of trying to blackmail him into giving her a better job.”I am going through painful agony,” said Mulakkal, who was jailed for three weeks and released on bail in October. “I tell everyone to pray to God: Let the truth prevail.”Catholicism envelopes this part of Kerala. Towns are marked by their cathedrals, convents and roadside shrines, where the Virgin watches passing traffic or St George slays the dragon. Businesses proclaim their owners’ faith: St Mary’s Furniture and Bed Center; Ave Maria Electronics; Jesus Oil Industries.Around here, many see Mulakkal as a martyr.A string of supporters visited him in jail, and crowds greeted him when he returned home, a ring of policemen holding back people who showered him with flower petals. “Hearty Welcome!” a banner proclaimed.But at the St Francis convent, one group of nuns watched news reports about that welcome with dismay. While the sister leveling the accusations against Mulakkal does not speak publicly, a half-dozen nuns cluster around her, offering support and speaking on her behalf.”Nobody came to see sister, but so many people came to wait in line to meet Bishop Franco in jail,” said Villoonnickal, the nun, who moved back to Kerala to support the woman she calls “our survivor sister.”That sister was the second of five children in a Kerala family. Her father was in the army. Her mother died when she was in high school. Wracked with grief, she was sent to stay with a cousin – a priest – living in north India. Inspired by her time with him, she became a nun in 1994, working in her early years as a teacher.She knew Mulakkal, of course. Everyone in the Missionaries of Jesus knows him. But the two were never close, the accuser’s friends say, and had no consensual sexual relationship.It was about fear.”The bishop is such a powerful person and standing against him, where will she go?” asked Villoonnickal. “If she went home what will happen to her?””Many times she was telling him to stop. But each time he was forcing himself on her,” she continued.Eventually, they say, she told some sisters what was happening. Then she says she repeatedly complained to church authorities. When nothing happened, she went to the police.She also went to confession.There, according to the other nuns, she was told she had to resist the bishop.”‘Even if you have to die, don’t submit yourself.'” the priest told her in confession, according to Villoonnickal. “‘Be courageous.'”Catholic authorities have said little about the case, with India’s Catholic Bishops’ Conference saying in an October statement that it has no jurisdiction over individual bishops, and that the investigation and court case, which could take many years, must run their course.”Silence should in no way be construed as siding with either of the two parties,” the group said. “We request prayers for the Church at this difficult time.”In Malayalam, the language of Kerala, sisters who leave the convent are sometimes marked as “Madhilu Chadi” — Wall Jumpers. It’s a mocking term for the sexually frustrated and is often used for nuns and priests who have fled religious life.Those who stay get respect. They have communities that embrace them. Their lives have direction, purpose. Those who leave often find themselves adrift in India, searching for new identities and spurned by families and friends. The events that knit families together — weddings, funerals, reunions — are suddenly off-limits. The emotional toll can be immense.Speaking up about the church’s troubles, many nuns say, could end with them forced from their convents, cut off in many ways from what they’ve always known.”It’s a fear of being isolated if I speak the truth,” said the nun who fought off the drunken priest. “If you do that, you have to go against your own community, your own religious superiors.”The result is an engulfing silence. Silence is the armor that sisters use to protect themselves and the lives they have created, even if it also means struggling with their memories, and protecting the men who abused them.In the end, most say nothing.”I didn’t tell anybody,” said the nun who escaped the priest kissing her chest, and who waited many years to talk about what had happened to her. “So you understand how these things are covered up.”last_img read more

Athens installs Alexander the Great statue after 27year

first_imgAthens on Friday installed its first Alexander the Great statue, a project mired in bureaucratic delays for nearly three decades.The 3,50-metre (11.5-foot) equestrian statue of a young Alexander, cast in bronze, was erected in central Athens opposite a statue of Lord Byron.According to the city of Athens, it was completed in 1972 and acquired by the state in 1992, at a time of intense nationalist feeling over a bitter name dispute with the newly-independent former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.Athens Mayor Giorgos Kaminis insisted Friday the move had “nothing” to do with the Macedonia dispute.”The decision to erect the statue was taken in 2015. This is a mark of the delays of Greek bureaucracy,” Kaminis told AFP.The fourth-century BC warrior king, born in today’s northern Greek region of Macedonia, is a hero figure to Greeks. For decades, Athens accused Skopje of seeking to usurp its ancient heritage.Until now, there had also been no agreement in Athens on where to place the statue.A decade ago, a nationalist government in Skopje launched an initiative to erect its own statues to Alexander and his father Philip.In February, the former Yugoslav republic was officially renamed North Macedonia following a landmark deal with the leftist government in Greece that ended the three-decade dispute.Earlier this month, North Macedonia renamed its main football stadium, formerly known as Philip II arena, after the father of Alexander the Great.Skopje in recent months has also dropped Alexander the Great from the name of an airport and a highway.last_img read more

Full Show Flu Season In Houston And Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson Jan

first_imgWe offer a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps. Share On Friday’s Houston Matters: Houston officials say there have been five flu-related deaths in the region since November. How bad is this flu season compared to previous years? We talk it over.Also this hour: Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson talks about the importance of cosmic collisions — none of us would be here without them, he says — and about the challenges facing science these days. Tyson speaks at Jones Hall on Monday (Jan. 15) at 7:30 p.m. in an event hosted by Society for the Performing Arts.Also this hour: Our rotating panel of non-experts discusses The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly of the week’s news. And we talk with Houston runner Lisa Thompson, who despite being legally blind, is preparing to run in this weekend’s Chevron Houston Marathon.WATCH: Today’s Houston Matters 360-Degree Facebook Live Videolast_img read more