Several Small Earthquakes rocked Cherokee Over the Weekend

first_imgCherokee experienced four weak earthquakes in the early hours of Sunday morning. Three of those earthquakes were a magnitude of 2.2.The fourth was slightly weaker, measuring just 2.1 on the Richter scale because it happened further below the Earth’s surface.This is the third report of earthquakes in this area in the past week.The U.S. Geological Survey recorded a 2.6 magnitude earthquake shortly after midnight Sunday.last_img

Nepal earthquake may herald more Himalayan temblors

first_imgThe powerful earthquake that devastated Nepal late in the morning on 25 April, causing at least 3200 deaths, could be a fuse that ignites other powerful quakes in a region of the Himalayas that had been seismically quiet for centuries, experts say.The 7.9-magnitude earthquake was long overdue: The fault segment that ruptured hadn’t seen an earthquake since 1344 C.E., according to Laurent Bollinger, a geologist from the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission. This temblor originated 15 kilometers underground, where the Indian plate slides under southern Tibet at a rate of about 20 millimeters per year along the Main Himalayan Thrust fault. The plates snag against each other, building up pressure until the crustal rock gives out. The locked plates under Nepal have been close to the breaking point for centuries, says Vinod Gaur, a geophysicist at Bangalore’s CSIR Fourth Paradigm Institute who co-authored a Science article in 2001 warning of the possibility of highly destructive earthquakes in the Himalayas.The Kathmandu temblor seems to have released a portion of the strain building up in the central seismic gap (CSG), a 600-kilometer-long region south of Nepal straddling a major fault that has been eerily quiet for at least 500 years. While the CSG’s earthquake history is disputed—some geologists say a large quake in 1505 C.E. ruptured the gap, while others argue that the 1505 quake wasn’t large enough to do so—specialists concur that the CSG is overdue for a megaquake measuring greater than magnitude 8.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The 25 April earthquake wasn’t large enough to release all the CSG’s pent-up strain, according to Bollinger, Gaur, and other geologists studying the gap, but it did relieve strain at the eastern end. To release more strain, “earthquakes are now needed further west of the gap,” Bollinger says. The 25 April earthquake may well herald gap-filling quakes, Gaur says. When a portion of a lengthy fault ruptures, he says, it is like making a tiny nick in a piece of cloth and stretching it. This builds pressure along the tear’s edges and makes it susceptible to further rips. While that could happen farther along the CSG, the timing is impossible to predict. “It may rupture tomorrow, or it can rupture 75 years from now,” Gaur says.  In Nepal, meanwhile, the death toll is bound to rise—thanks in part to the region’s geology. Situated on an ancient lakebed, the Kathmandu Valley’s soil is soft and liquefies easily. “The ground motion gets amplified, and people there can feel [earthquakes] very vigorously,” says Vineet Kumar Gahalaut, a geologist at the National Geophysical Research Institute in Hyderabad, India.last_img read more

Imported wolves settle in as Lake Superior island teems with moose

first_img Thirteen new radio-collared wolves are now scouting Isle Royale in Michigan and feasting on moose, whose numbers this winter reached 2060—the second highest estimate since ecologists began to study predators and prey on the island in 1958. The new wolves, imported to help restore the U.S. national park from overbrowsing by moose, are largely avoiding the territory of the remaining two wolves of the original population.Twenty female moose are also sporting radio collars, allowing biologists to watch both wolf and moose movements online. After 8 years essentially unfettered by predation because wolf numbers were so low, the moose population has been booming at 19% a year, according to data released today by Michigan Technological University (MTU) in Houghton.The new wolves are expected to check moose numbers and help restore balsam fir and other plants, according to National Park Service (NPS) planners. And the flood of GPS data is revealing “stuff we’ve never seen before,” says MTU wildlife ecologist Rolf Peterson, such as where moose congregate to feed on new spring growth. Peterson and his colleagues plan to chemically analyze the specific balsam fir trees moose eat to determine whether they choose twigs with compounds that may have anti-inflammatory properties.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) National Parks of Lake Superior Foundation Imported wolves settle in as Lake Superior island teems with moose A male wolf from Michipicoten, Canada, heads into its new home on Isle Royale in Michigan last month.center_img By Christine MlotApr. 30, 2019 , 8:00 AM Meanwhile, the collared wolves are transmitting numerous locations where they cluster, presumed to be moose kills, which will help researchers collect moose bones. These new data “will totally redirect our attention,” Peterson says.Moose in the Great Lakes region are at the southernmost edge of their range, and they are declining as the climate changes—except on Isle Royale, notes Adrian Wydeven, a wildlife biologist retired from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in Cable. The new data may help scientists understand what’s behind that difference, he says. He sees the project “as more of a moose conservation effort rather than wolf conservation.”The NPS wolf relocation had a rough start, including a partial U.S. government shutdown in January, bad weather, and depleted funding. Two wolves died, one before transport, one after several weeks on the island; one imported female traveled back home when an ice bridge to the mainland formed in January.Eight wolves hail from Michipicoten Island Provincial Park in Canada across Lake Superior. (The others are from Minnesota and mainland Ontario in Canada.) Wolves on the smaller Ontario island had eliminated their chief prey, caribou, and had been subsisting mainly on beaver. These wolves appeared underfed, but they were relocated as a pack, boosting their chances of thriving on Isle Royale, Peterson says.Meanwhile, the island-born, highly inbred pair of the original population “is not giving up on each other,” says Peterson, who observed them from a spotter plane in February. As in previous mating seasons, the now 8-year-old female rebuffed the interest of the 10-year-old male, her father and half-sibling. They kept busy scent marking their territory in response to the relocated wolves as well as to tracks of other mainland wolves that apparently found their way across the ice bridge and back.The pair’s pedigree demonstrates the challenge of maintaining genetic diversity on Guam-size Isle Royale. “Inbreeding is basically inevitable due to the island’s small size,” says University of California, San Francisco, geneticist Jacqueline Robinson, who analyzed the genomes of 11 Isle Royale wolves from blood samples collected since 1988. To further diversify the population, NPS plans to import more wolves from Michigan this fall.last_img read more

New SportingPulse IPhone App

first_imgFeatures Include:·         See the latest ladder for all the teams you follow·         See where you’re playing and when·         Latest results for your team, plus round by round competition results·         Integration with Google Maps·         Access scores from your last game against an upcoming opponent Click here to download the new SportingPulse App from the iTunes StoreNote: If you have trouble searching for your affiliate or competition, this can be rectified by entering Affiliate locater details via the SportingPulse Membership database. For further information please contact the national office on (02) 6212 2800 or visit the SportingPulse website click here.Related LinksNew SportingPulse App SportingPulse has launched a new Iphone App. This app replaces the MySport Scoreboard App and is now available to download from the Itunes App Store.last_img read more

TFA National Training Squads Announced

first_imgDean Springfield Rohit Prasad Sarah Peattie Tim Good Matt Prowse Jonathan Palau Jess McCall Leah Opie Kristin Boss Kristy Brennan Michael Law Oscar Sanft Danielle Davis Emilee Cherry Ashleigh Quinlan Charlotte Caslick Catherine Sargent Scott Buckley Willie Bishop Daniel Barton Lizzie Campbell Scott Bundy Tim Glazebrook Patricia Michaelopolous Nicole Beck Louise Winchester Kim Sue See Alicia Quirk Elin Mortimer Women’s Open Rob Nakhla Emily Hennessey Jordan Marshall Peta Rogerson Rachel Beck Sarah Spacie Marikki Wategocenter_img Peter Norman Kirsty Quince Cara Zaremski Sam Brisby Terry Deegan Jenna Hitch Trent Touma Kylie Hilder Dylan Thompson Steve Roberts Mixed Open Stay tuned to www.austouch.com.au for all of the latest news and information regarding the 2014 Trans Tasman Series. Related Filesnts_announcement_release-pdfRelated LinksNational Training Squads Leah Percy Touch Football Australia (TFA) is proud to announce its National Training Squads for the 2014 Trans Tasman Series against arch rivals New Zealand, which will take place in Mudgee, New South Wales in April, 2014.The Open teams (Men’s, Women’s and Mixed) will be looking to win back the prestigious Trans Tasman trophy following a loss to New Zealand in the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series, with the Women’s team the only side of the three to win their division.The squads consist of 18 players across the divisions yet to represent Australia at an Open’s level, with plenty of exciting up-and-coming talent selected in the squads following Australia’s Youth division clean sweep over New Zealand in the Super Trans Tasman Series. While there are some new faces in the squads, the teams will still contain a great deal of international experience, with the three Open’s teams combined comprising a total of more than 550 Australian Touch Football caps.Touch Football Australia wishes to congratulate the following players who have been named in the Australian squads: Melissa Peters Kristian Congoo Maddison Studdon Simon Lang Matt Tope Laura Peattie Justin Mitchell Dan Withers Luke Tonegato Lawrence Oberleuter Michael Chapman James Shute Claire Winchester Men’s Open Adam Pryde Sebe Rey Nick Good Stuart Brierty Dylan Hennessey Nicole McHugh Ben Moylanlast_img read more

Energy group calls for better tax and regulation to restore competitiveness

first_imgOTTAWA – The head of the group that represents Canada’s oil and gas industry is calling on the federal government to cut taxes and ease regulatory burdens to restore the energy sector’s competitiveness with the United States and other global producers.Tim McMillan, CEO of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, says Canada is “falling behind” and must act now to restore investor confidence, citing in particular lower corporate taxes and business-friendly regulatory changes by the U.S. under President Donald Trump.McMillan appeared at a news conference in Ottawa one day before the federal budget is presented but the event was cast as the introduction of a series of economic reports, not an attempt to influence the budget.In answer to a question, however, McMillan said last year’s budget sent a “terrible signal to the world” by limiting allowable tax deductions for oil and gas exploration wells.He added there are currently some 50 changes to energy industry policies being contemplated by provincial and federal governments, including recently proposed sweeping changes to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and the National Energy Board, that are harming Canada’s reputation as a transparent and fair place to do business.McMillan said he’s heard from some Calgary-based energy CEOs with operations in the U.S. who say lower taxes are making them more likely to invest there than in Canada.last_img read more

Aphria chief executive and cofounder stepping aside from executive roles

first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:APHA)The Canadian Press LEAMINGTON, Ont. — Marijuana producer Aphria Inc. says chief executive Vic Neufeld and co-founder Cole Cacciavillani will be leaving their executive roles at the company, but will remain on the board.Neufeld says he and Cacciavillani will begin the transition process immediately, and at the appropriate time, they will both step down from executive positions at Aphria.The change comes as Aphria faces allegations by short-sellers questioning the company’s acquisitions in Colombia, Argentina and Jamaica. Aphria has denied the allegations, but established a special committee of independent directors to review the deals.Aphria also received a hostile takeover offer late last year from Ohio-based Xanthic Biopharma Inc., which does business as Green Growth Brands, that it rejected as being too low.The company reported today that revenue totalled $21.7 million in what was its second quarter as Canada’s legal recreational market began. The total was up from $8.5 million a year ago.Aphria earned a profit of $54.8 million or 22 cents per share for its quarter ended Nov. 30 compared with a profit of $6.5 million or five cents per share for the same period last year.last_img read more

17th Street Bridge in Dawson Creek closed due to high water levels

first_imgHenderson said that the city’s other bridges and culverts, including the one that was famously overtopped two years ago on 8th St., are currently faring well with the high water levels. He said that officials have so far not had any reports of damage to residents’ property. Henderson added however that the situation may change as water levels tend to peak in the late afternoon due to the warn daytime temperatures.As another precautionary measure, the City of Dawson Creek is handing out free sand bags for residents. The sandbags and sand will be made available at the west side of Kitchen Park, at the corner of 18th Street and 109th Avenue. Henderson said that although the creek is not expected to reach levels seen in prior floods, there may be some residents who could use sandbags to divert runoff.Updates can be found on the City’s Facebook page. DAWSON CREEK, B.C. — The City of Dawson Creek has closed the 17th Street Bridge because of rising water levels in the city’s namesake, though officials don’t believe that the water will rise to levels last seen two years ago.Dawson Creek’s General Manager of Development Services Kevin Henderson said the City decided to close the 17th Street bridge earlier today as a precautionary measure. Henderson explained that the water in Dawson Creek did overtop the bridge for a short time this morning, though it has since receded to approximately a foot below the road level.The bridge was one of several that were closed during the floods of June 2016, though it reopened a short time after.last_img read more

Oil surges and loonie rises but markets muted on new NAFTA deal

first_imgShares of Canada’s largest auto parts company, Magna International Inc., closed up 2.2 percent at $69.36, while Linamar Corp. was up 6.3 percent to $63.26 and Martinrea International Inc. was up 10.5 percent to $14.57.U.S. President Donald Trump had threatened to impose punishing auto tariffs on Canada if it didn’t reach a deal to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement.As a side deal to the new pact, called U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement, or USMCA, the Trump administration has agreed to exempt Canada if the United States imposes 25 percent tariffs on imported vehicles and auto parts.Excluding energy, the TSX likely fell as information technology led sectors on the downside with BlackBerry shares falling 5.1 percent. “It’s got to be good news for just about everybody but it is a bit of a muted response,” Michael Currie, vice-president and investment adviser at TD Wealth, said of the reaction to the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement.The energy sector led the market, rising two percent on the back of a 38-per-cent increase in MEG Energy Corp. shares following a hostile takeover offer by Husky Energy Inc. valued at $6.4 billion, including the assumption of $3.1 billion in debt.On top of that, reports have suggested LNG Canada, an estimated $40-billion gas liquefaction plant and pipeline that was delayed in 2016, could be officially sanctioned shortly.“We haven’t seen many deals out of the energy patch of this size in quite a while,” Currie said in an interview.Crude prices gained almost three percent Monday with the November crude contract up US$2.05 to US$75.30 per barrel.“If you are in the oilpatch you couldn’t ask for a better day.” TORONTO, O.N. – The price of oil hit a four-year high and the Canadian dollar rose to its highest level since May on Monday, but the reaction in North American markets to a tentative trade deal to replace NAFTA was pretty subdued.After rising sharply in early trading, markets ended the day moderately higher mainly due to the performance of the important energy sector in Canada and of General Electric Co. in the U.S.The S&P/TSX composite index hit a high of 16,193.06 but closed up just 31.29 points to 16,104.43.center_img The loonie was trading at an average of 78.11 cents US, up from an average of 77.25 cents US on Friday. That’s the highest level since May 22.The increase is directly attributable to the trade deal involving Canada, the United States and Mexico, said Currie, who noted that bank economists are predicting the loonie could head to the 80-cent range.Removing the trade uncertainty likely also means the Bank of Canada will increase its interest rate by 0.25 percentage.“It looks like full steam ahead for a rate hike this month and that pushes up the Canadian dollar too.”Meanwhile, in New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 192.90 points to 26,651.21. The S&P 500 index was up 10.61 points at 2,924.59, while the Nasdaq composite was down 9.05 points to 8,037.30.The November natural gas contract was up 8.6 cents at US$3.09 per million BTU’s.The December gold contract was down US$4.50 at US$1,191.70 an ounce and the December copper contract was down 1.75 cents at US$2.79 a pound.By Ross MarowitsTHE CANADIAN PRESSlast_img read more

New natural gas plants will have to pay carbon tax on all

first_imgThe federal government is increasing the carbon tax on new natural-gas plants to discourage power companies from building them.The change is part of final regulations for the government’s carbon-tax system for big industrial greenhouse-gas emitters, which are being released this week.The system affects businesses that produce more than 50,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases a year. It is designed to limit impacts on competitiveness for major industrial emitters, who will pay the carbon tax on a portion of what they emit rather than on all the fuels that they use.The emission standard set for natural-gas power plants originally meant that new ones would likely never pay any carbon tax, which was a disincentive for power companies to turn to renewable-energy sources instead of gas.The change made this week means new natural-gas plants will have their emissions standard toughened each year after 2021, until in 2030 they will pay the carbon price on every ounce of their emissions.last_img read more