a month agoSouthampton defender Maya Yoshida: I think we missed a huge opportunity

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Southampton defender Maya Yoshida: I think we missed a huge opportunityby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveSouthampton defender Maya Yoshida felt they missed a huge opportunity to capitalise on a ten-man Spurs after the 2-1 defeat at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.Saints found themselves on level terms after Danny Ings pounced on a Hugo Lloris mistake to equalise against a Spurs side who were down to ten men from the 31st minute.But the hosts soon went back in front, and Saints were unable to break them down for a second time after the interval, with Yoshida denied by a stunning Lloris save from the pick of the chances.“I think we missed a huge opportunity to win against a big team today,” the defender said.“Obviously it’s a huge disappointment for myself, but if we have the chance we have to take it, otherwise it will get more difficult.“After Aurier was sent off, we were too passive. We have to be much more aggressive, and after we conceded the second goal in a sloppy way, it became more difficult for us.“In the second half, we needed more creativity in the attacking third. They defended very well, but for myself, I needed to score from the corner kick.“Again, there was an opportunity and we couldn’t take it. Now it’s a really difficult situation for ourselves, but we cannot look behind us too much.“It’s another important game against Chelsea next week, so we’ll focus on that and keep going.” last_img read more

BRYAN ADAMS SAYS ORIGINAL MASTERS OF BIG HITS LOST IN UNIVERSAL FIRE

first_imgMany of those musicians only learned recently of the damage through a report in The New York Times, after Universal downplayed the impact for years. Several acts, including Soundgarden and an estate representing Tupac Shakur, have sued, alleging that Universal failed to protect music ruined in the fire and inform them of the extent of its impact. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Universal suggested the Times “overstated” the losses, but the label’s CEO has said he owes the artists “transparency” and “answers” on the damage.Adams says he only learned of the impact when he started plotting a 30th anniversary reissue of his No. 1 album Reckless six years ago. Bryan Adams performs during the 2015 AFL Grand Final match between the Hawthorn Hawks and the West Coast Eagles at Melbourne Cricket Ground on October 3, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. Quinn Rooney / GETTY IMAGES He contacted the archival department of Universal Music Group, which stored the master tapes, artwork and videos for his album, which included the massive hits “Summer of ‘69” and “Heaven.” But he returned almost empty-handed when they couldn’t find copies.Adams explained by email he eventually located a “safety copy” of the Reckless master at his vault in the Warehouse Studio in Vancouver, which led to a remastered edition of Reckless in 2014.But he says he’s uncertain if master copies for his eight other studio albums at A&M, which was later acquired by Universal, still exist. Those projects would include Cuts Like a Knife and Waking Up the Neighbours.Sheryl Crow, meanwhile. says the original tapes of albums such as Tuesday Night Music Club and the track “All I Wanna Do” perished in a 2008 fire at Universal Music Group.Crow told the BBC Wednesday that her master tapes and back-ups were destroyed in the blaze and that she only discovered the loss after a New York Times report revealed the extent of the damage.Crow says the fire “feels a little apocalyptic” and that she didn’t “understand the coverup.”Universal did not immediately respond to a request for comment.By David Friend ~ The Canadian Press ~ With files from the Associated Presscenter_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter Bryan Adams says the original masters of many of his biggest hits were likely destroyed in a 2008 fire at Universal Studios Hollywood, a blaze for which the extent of the damage has only recently come to light.The Kingston, Ont.-born singer-songwriter is among hundreds of artists whose original master recordings, artwork and photography is believed to have perished in the massive fire that engulfed a part of the Hollywood backlot over a decade ago. The list includes a number of Canadian acts, including Joni Mitchell, Nelly Furtado and Rufus Wainwright. Advertisementlast_img read more

CMHC looks to Airbnb in bid to boost withering supply of affordable

first_imgOTTAWA – Canada’s housing agency is looking to an unlikely ally in a bid to boost the stock of affordable rental housing: Airbnb.The head of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., says he believes short-term rental companies like Airbnb and Vacation Rental By Owner (VRBO) could help increase the rental supply in the country and, in turn, possibly reduce rents.The government’s upcoming national housing strategy will have a heavy focus on increasing the supply of affordable housing options, including rental units and Airbnb alone offers the potential for tens of thousands of units.CMHC chief executive Evan Siddall said his agency recently approached Airbnb, the largest such service in Canada, to see if there are ways to turn those short-term rentals into apartments available to locals to rent for longer terms. He cautioned that it was still early days with a lot of details yet to work out.“I think VRBO and Airbnb should get ahead of this, because they could be giving us some social utility by helping us spawn supply,” Siddall said in a recent interview with The Canadian Press.Lindsey Scully, a spokeswoman for Airbnb, said the company is speaking with potential partners about ways to “create economic opportunity for everyday people.”“We take the issue of affordable housing seriously and that is why we are collaborating with communities and organizations across Canada, sharing comprehensive data and detailed information about our community,” she said.The supply of purpose-built rental units in the country has been on a decades-long decline as developers build more condominiums than apartments.As a result, the rental vacancy rate in 2016 was 3.7 per cent nationwide, CMHC research shows, a number that glosses over acute shortages in some cities. Vancouver, Victoria, and Kelowna, for instance, all had vacancy rates under one per cent in 2016, meaning there were limited options for renters and the conditions in place to push rents higher as demand outstripped supply.The shortage is equally acute in the secondary rental market that has sprung up over the last eight years as condominium owners rent out their units to make a profit. A CMHC survey of 22 cities showed vacancy rates in these condominiums ranged from a low of 0.3 per cent in Vancouver to a high of 6.8 per cent in Edmonton.Into this mix enter home-sharing services and concerns that they have further eroded the supply of rental units.Airbnb says its hosts typically share their homes on average up to 60 nights per year, earning themselves about $4,000 — figures that the company suggests aren’t high enough to support the idea that it is squeezing units out of the long-term rental market.In a study published this summer, a McGill University research team estimated that Airbnb hosts have removed about 13,700 units from rental markets in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, or about two per cent of the total housing stock.The authors argued that services like Airbnb would pull more long-term rentals off the market as home and condo owners see more money to be made through short-term rentals.“We’re not even close to the situation where there’s enough supply of rental housing to meet demand and when you’re in those very, very constrained situations, then even just a couple thousand units getting pulled off the market by Airbnb can have a really major impact on prices,” said lead researcher David Wachsmuth.To keep those units in the rental market, governments have to create incentives where few currently exist, said said Wachsmuth, an assistant professor of urban planning.last_img read more

In a plot twist Spirit tops US airlines in ontime arrivals

first_imgDALLAS — Spirit Airlines tops the latest ratings for on-time flights, a stunning turnaround for a discount carrier that consistently ranked as the tardiest airline in America three years ago.The Transportation Department said Friday that 89 per cent of Spirit’s flights in October arrived on time, putting Spirit just ahead of frequent winner Hawaiian Airlines and Delta.It’s the first time the Miramar, Florida-based carrier has topped the rankings. It finished second in November 2017.Spirit had the worst on-time performance every month but one between May 2015 and May 2016. Since then, Spirit has added room in its schedule, reduced red-eye flights and increased the number of pilots who can be called in on short notice.The government counts a flight on time if it arrives within 14 minutes of schedule.David Koenig, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Report Earth Hour participation in BC dropping despite support for conserving energy

first_imgVANCOUVER, B.C. – A new report released today by BC Hydro finds most British Columbians still think Earth Hour is important despite four years of declining participation.The report entitled “Lights out: Why Earth Hour is dimming in B.C.” found British Columbians reduced their electricity use during Earth Hour – an annual global event hosted by the World Wildlife Fund that encourages turning off the lights for an hour to raise awareness around combatting climate change – by just 0.3 percent in 2017, or 15 percent of the savings achieved in 2008.The decline comes despite 7 in 10 British Columbians surveyed for the report saying they intend to participate in Earth Hour this year. The findings suggest BC Hydro’s largely hydroelectric generation may account for the lack participation in Earth Hour. Electricity generation accounts for only 1 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in B.C. “While Earth Hour may have lost some of its momentum in B.C. in recent years, we still see this as a symbolic event – a way to raise awareness about energy conservation,” said Chris O’Riley, BC Hydro’s President and Chief Operating Officer. “That’s why we are encouraging British Columbians to turn off unnecessary lights and electronics from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Saturday in support of Earth Hour.”BC Hydro customers can view an hourly breakdown of their electricity use for Saturday evening by logging onto their online MyHydro account to see how much they saved.The Northern Environmental Action Team is hosting an Earth Hour Run on Saturday night to help encourage conservation.  The 5k run will start at 8 p.m. and the kids 1k will start at 7 p.m. Both runs will start at Northern Lights College. You can still register online at www.energetictickets.ca or from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday at Northern Lights College.last_img read more

Province launches two reviews into BC Hydro over costs future of energy

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – The B.C. government has launched a two-phase review of BC Hydro in an effort to find cost savings and direction for the Crown utility.The first part of the review is expected to examine ways to save money within Hydro, create new revenue streams in an effort to keep rates low and give the corporation the resources it needs to provide electricity.An advisory group that includes staff from government ministries and BC Hydro will conduct the first review. The government says in a news release that it expects recommendations from the first phase of the review to be complete by this fall.It says the second phase of the review will build on new strategies from the first phase and include ways to ensure Hydro can maximize opportunities around the shift in global energy sectors.The expert panel conducting the second phase would aim to deliver its recommendation to the government by the summer or fall of next year.last_img read more

New natural gas plants will have to pay carbon tax on all

first_imgThe federal government is increasing the carbon tax on new natural-gas plants to discourage power companies from building them.The change is part of final regulations for the government’s carbon-tax system for big industrial greenhouse-gas emitters, which are being released this week.The system affects businesses that produce more than 50,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases a year. It is designed to limit impacts on competitiveness for major industrial emitters, who will pay the carbon tax on a portion of what they emit rather than on all the fuels that they use.The emission standard set for natural-gas power plants originally meant that new ones would likely never pay any carbon tax, which was a disincentive for power companies to turn to renewable-energy sources instead of gas.The change made this week means new natural-gas plants will have their emissions standard toughened each year after 2021, until in 2030 they will pay the carbon price on every ounce of their emissions.last_img read more

Uri a very special film for me Vicky

first_imgMumbai: Actor Vicky Kaushal says Uri: The Surgical Strike will always remain close to his heart. “Uri… is a very special film for me and our idea was to give tribute to the Indian armed forces. The soldiers give up their today for our tomorrow and no words can signify or repay the sacrifices they make for our country,” said Vicky. “The way audiences have resonated with the emotion of patriotism, valour and sacrifices of our armed forces has been amazing. As artists, that is the biggest takeaway for us,” added the actor, who was seen as Major Vihaan Singh Shergill in the film. Directed by Aditya Dhar, gritty drama, which traces events of the 2016 Uri attack and its aftermath, also features Yami Gautam.last_img read more

Why Bryce Harper Has Gone From Great To Good

So far in 2016, Harper’s exit velocity is down almost two and a half mph from his average last season — even as MLB’s overall exit velocity has spiked this year. Alongside that decrease in exit velocity has come a sharp increase in launch angle. Harper’s typical batted ball in 2015 ranged between a launch angle of about 13 to 16 degrees, giving him a line drive swing conducive to a high batting average. Harper started this season in a similar range, but he’s seen his game-by-game average creep up to a 20 degree launch angle in the last few weeks. Pop-ups have come along with that elevated launch angle, as he’s seen his infield-fly percentage almost double from 5.8 percent in 2015 to 10.7 percent in 2016. That subset of his batted balls are certain outs, so they explain a significant fraction of the decline in his batting average on balls in play.And it’s not a product of pitchers approaching Harper differently this season. Usually, balls thrown higher in the zone tend to get hit along higher trajectories as well; it’s one of the reasons high-ball hurler Chris Young leads the league in homers allowed. So it’s conceivable that pitchers had adjusted to Harper’s power by getting him to chase pitches high in the zone, causing more glancing contact. Yet Harper’s average pitch height in 2016 is only a tenth of an inch higher than in 2015, and his horizontal pitch location hasn’t changed either.Instead, the culprit for Harper’s problems seems to be genuinely diminished power. Let’s zoom in on a 1.5-foot wide, 6-inch tall rectangle at the center of the strike zone. Hitters normally punish the ball here, hammering balls in that region with an average exit velocity of 90.7 mph — and Harper did even better than that in 2015, hitting batted balls out of that area at 96 mph. (Fourteen of Harper’s 42 homers came from that region.) But in 2016, he’s barely exceeding the league average with an exit velocity of 90.8 mph. So far this season, he’s already made more outs in this central part of the strike zone (57) than he did in all of 2015.Pitches that Harper was punishing before are now leaving his bat more weakly, and turning into outs more often. Harper’s raw power — once his calling card — has diminished to near league-average levels, and not as a result of bad luck or a new approach from pitchers. Harper’s track record — and the projections informed by it — suggests his slugging will return eventually, but it’s impossible to say whether he needs a simple mechanical tweak or extensive time to recover from a hidden injury.Even without 450-foot home runs, this diminished version of Bryce Harper remains a good ballplayer, a testament to the breadth and depth of his skills. But at the same time, this just isn’t the Harper we were all expecting to see after the historic performance he produced last season.Check out our latest MLB predictions. Just 10 months ago, Bryce Harper was putting the finishing touches on one of the greatest position-player performances of all time. Harper slugged his way to 9.5 wins above replacement1According to FanGraphs, though Baseball-Reference.com’s version had him recording a 9.9 WAR. last season, largely on the basis of the best single-season offensive campaign since Barry Bonds broke baseball in 2004.2Among qualified hitters. But this year, Harper’s hitting numbers have slipped, and his overall value has suffered as a result.Sometimes drastic drop-offs like these are the result of bad luck, or even opposing pitchers changing their approach. But with the help of data from MLB’s radar-tracking Statcast system, we can see that Harper’s slump is a consequence of diminished power, which might be a more difficult fix.Harper’s eye-popping .330/.460/.649 triple-slash line in 2015 was driven by patience and power. He walked 0.95 times for every strikeout, the sixth-best ratio in baseball, and led MLB in isolated power (ISO) with a .319 mark. Between intentional walks, Harper managed to drive 42 home runs, making monster blasts a regular occurrence in Nationals Park.Some of that magic carried on into the first half of 2016, but lately Harper’s stats have taken a tumble. Although his walk-to-strikeout ratio has improved, his ISO is down more than a hundred points, to .209. As a result, his overall production has dropped to a pedestrian (at least by Harper’s standards) 115 Weighted Runs Created Plus (wRC+), from 197 the year before.Statcast has tracked Harper’s decline in real time. It monitors the exit velocity and launch angle every time a player makes contact, characteristics which can be used together to predict a batted ball’s value in terms of runs.3I built a Random Forest model to predict the value of each batted ball, as described in an earlier article. By looking at changes in Harper’s underlying Statcast metrics, one can judge whether he has been merely unlucky, or if he’s truly experiencing a decline in skills. In 2015, the actual value of Harper’s batted balls exceeded what we would have expected, given their exit velocity/launch angle combinations, by a significant margin. Given available data, we can’t say what combination of foot-speed and luck drove that divergence, but so far this year his actual production on batted balls has declined precipitously — even going below what the model predicts.More tellingly, Harper’s predicted batted-ball value has fallen substantially as well. Much of that reduction is owed to a decrease in exit velocity, one of the biggest components of hitting skill. Hit the ball harder, and it’s more likely to go past fielders or over fences; softer, and those same fielders can throw you out, or a would-be home run turns into a warning-track flyout instead. read more

How the Ohio State baseball team passes the time during rain delays

Rain delays are a big part of baseball, and the Ohio State baseball team was reminded of that this past weekend. During rain-outs, the players have to keep themselves entertained, and the Buckeyes have a few preferred pastimes they use while waiting to participate in America’s pastime. A game can be delayed when rain causes low visibility for players, the field isn’t playable due to pooling or standing water or if there is lightning in the area, according to the Major League Baseball rule book. The umpires at the games make rulings about rain delays. Delayed games might be resumed when the weather improves to the umpires’ liking, or the field is cleared of water, but are canceled and can be made up in a doubleheader if the problem persists. The OSU baseball team had two games postponed due to rain. The most recent weather-related interruption in the Buckeyes’ schedule occurred Saturday when OSU’s afternoon game against Nebraksa was rained out and rescheduled for Sunday as part of a doubleheader. OSU lost both games, 5-4, and 17-9, respectively, and lost the series, 2-1. The Buckeyes also had seven games rained-out and cancelled last season. Buckeye players said no one has done anything comparable to the viral videos of minor-leaguers jousting or holding a dance competition, but they like to have fun during weather delays. “We haven’t had any jousting, but we had our manager slide across the turf when it was raining,” said senior outfielder Dave Corna. “But for the most part, we’re just fooling around and staying loose.” Senior pitcher Andrew Armstrong said the Buckeyes haven’t had a chance to bust out anything too crazy since there’s only been one rain delay. Armstrong also said as a team, they like to stay relaxed during delays before and during games. “It all really depends on what you feel like doing,” Armstrong said. “Some guys like to have fun and do stuff. We’ll go and play two-ball, a practice game or we’ll watch TV. It depends on the mood of the game. Like, if we’re losing probably not a lot, but if it’s before the game we’ll just have fun.” Players said they like to stay relaxed during the delays in the middle of games, but coach Greg Beals said the players tend to keep working as well. “You try to keep it loose,” Beals said. “Some guys will go in (to the team clubhouse) and play cards or play XBOX, and some guys will even hit in the batting cages. Other guys will just sit in the dugout and play the name game. A bunch of different stuff goes on.” Beals said his team is full of guys with lots of personality, but the fun will stay in-house when the tarp is rolled out onto the field because of rain. “We’ve got some good characters in our club, but we’re not the type to go out on stage and do it,” Beals said. “We’ll keep it in the clubhouse.” read more